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Reply #30 posted 07/01/20 10:23am

DiminutiveRock
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"if your voice held no power, they wouldn't try to silence you."
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Reply #31 posted 07/02/20 1:23am

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OldFriends4Sale said:


In response to the growing risk of COVID-19 spreading throughout our jails, prisons and detention centers at an alarming rate, award winning artists, system impacted individuals, leading organizers on the frontlines and influential organizations from around the country have come together to launch the #WeMatterToo Campaign to pressure public officials to take action to remedy the situation, amplify the voices and stories of people who are incarcerated and empower communities to be agents of change. Every day that goes by without action means more people will get sick with COVID-19 and die. Visit https://www.wemattertoo.co/ for more information.

-Common



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Love this. Having worked in jails, I know the public often don't care about the inmates and their rights. It's good that it is being highlighted, especially in this way.

The Org is my playground and y'all are my playmates.
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Reply #32 posted 07/02/20 4:56am

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This is 1 of my favs.

DiminutiveRocker said:

A MASK ISN'T TOO MUCH TO ASK!!
JJPOPPYSBOMBSQUAD #OPINIONSMATTER
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Reply #33 posted 07/09/20 9:07am

OldFriends4Sal
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Resilience Is The Most Powerful Skill Kids Can Develop Right Now

Caroline Bologna 5/14/2020

On the morning after 9/11, Denver-based therapist Craig Knippenberg stood in front of 450 students and many of their parents at a K-8 school assembly. He held a china teacup in one hand and a rubber ball in the other.

First, he asked what would happen if he dropped the teacup. They said it would break. Then, he held up the ball and asked the same question.

"'It would bounce back,' they replied. This, I explained, is being resilient and that we as a nation and as a school community, with the help of each other, would bounce back," he recalled in an interview with HuffPost.

Today in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, Knippenberg believes that the value of resilience cannot be overstated.

"While many modern parents are obsessed with providing the perfect stress- and worry-free life for their children, they miss one of the most important lessons they can teach their children," he said. "Without [resilience], children are artificially propped up in a world of rainbows and unicorns. When failures or crises occur, they are like a teacup that shatters."

Children need to develop resilience to cope with the setbacks and roadblocks that the world inevitably throws at all of us. They'll be better prepared for life if they learn how to work through difficult circumstances, explore painful emotions, manage stress, accept what is out of our control, fail, and try again.

"While we certainly don't want our children to experience a pandemic crisis, it is important to view this time as an opportunity for growth. This is the strange but positive side to adapting to the current times," said Neha Navsaria, a psychiatry professor at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and a consultant at the parenting skills site Parent Lab. "Sitting with uncertainty is one of the most difficult tasks for any human being to do. Learning how to manage it is one of the best skills one can develop to contribute to mental wellness."

HuffPost spoke to Knippenberg, Navsaria and other experts about the ways parents can help foster resilience in their kids during these uncertain times. Read on for their advice.

Resist The Urge To 'Save' Them

"Parents can help their children tremendously by not 'saving' them," said clinical psychologist John Mayer. Although it's hard to watch your children struggle or fail, they gain self-confidence by learning to pick themselves up after making mistakes. Don't shield them from difficult feelings or challenges.

During the pandemic, parents should offer a sense of safety and security, of course. But they should also encourage their children to practice problem-solving by letting them find their own ways to cope with their new reality.

Kids are experiencing loss without their traditional school, extracurricular activities and social lives. Mayer sees this as an opportunity for children to learn to thrive by themselves, as there will inevitably be times in the future when they experience loss again.

"Well-meaning parents are going out of their way to provide a banquet table of activities to keep their children entertained or diverted," he said. "Stop! Let your child discover their own ways to cope. This is phenomenal emotional growth and skill-building for the future."

While parents can certainly help organize projects and offer guidance, he advised empowering kids to take more of a lead in setting their day-to-day schedules and in directing family activities as well.

Focus On Support Instead

Rather than jumping in to fix the problem when kids are bored with their toys or unmotivated to do school work, parents should let them feel their feelings as they face these challenges. The key is to listen to and encourage them so that they feel comfortable taking control.

"There is a core of resilience in every young person, and they are more adaptable than we think," said Genevieve von Lob, a psychologist and author of "Happy Parent, Happy Child." "However, they can only unearth it if they are sometimes allowed to face their vulnerable feelings and we can keep trusting that they will get through. The more that we can support our children to move through their feelings and not run away from them, the more emotionally resilient, confident and adaptable they will grow up to be."

Parents can remind their kids of challenges they've overcome in the past, even just earlier during the lockdown. They can repeatedly tell them that they are safe and have a loving family to care for them. They can arrange virtual playdates or phone calls to help them get support from others.

They can also encourage a positive mindset by focusing on the progress that people have made during this time, applauding community leaders, creating a calm environment at home, and using nonverbal cues like loving smiles and hugs.

© skynesher via Getty Images Parents should encourage their kids to talk about their feelings.

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Talk About Emotions

"Allow space for all the feelings you and your littles are experiencing," said Kelly Oriard, a family therapist and co-founder of Slumberkins, an education brand focused on emotional learning. "Resilience does not mean 'everything is great right now!' (cue fake smile). It means noticing the feelings bubbling up and being honest about it. Those feelings we push down and hide will come out in one way or another so we might as well face them head-on."

Parents can promote emotional growth by encouraging their children to talk about their feelings, helping them identify those feelings and validating them. This kind of communication may also foster a stronger family connection.

"Being able to recognize, understand and manage one's emotions is key to resilience," said Denise Daniels, a child development expert and creator of The Moodsters, a brand focused on fostering emotional intelligence in kids. "Nearly every moment of a child's life provides opportunities to teach important emotional skills such as caring, listening, empathy, problem-solving, self-regulation and resilience. That holds particularly true in challenging times such as these."

The ability to talk about difficult feelings is a powerful coping mechanism, but it can take practice to get comfortable with these conversations. Knippenberg suggested that parents sit with their kids and write down all the things they feel they have lost or are upset about during the pandemic, and then put those pieces of paper in a jar and share.

Highlight What's In Their Control

"To offset a sense of helplessness, parents should talk to children about what they are all doing to play a part in helping, such as social distancing and wearing masks," Navsaria advised. "This teaches children problem-solving skills. When children develop a roadmap to solve problems, they feel a better sense of agency and control — all contributors to resilience."

In addition to practical steps to prevent illness (like washing hands and keeping a safe distance from others in the grocery store), there are many other areas of pandemic life that kids can control: how they spend their time at home, what they do to manage tough emotions, which self-care tools they utilize to reduce stress, etc. Parents and kids can discuss these coping methods and even make a list of them together.

"Parents can use the term 'bounce back' to make the process more accessible to children, but it is equally important for parents to walk children through the details of the process," said Navsaria. "It is easy to forget that children need these complex processes to be broken down into small, digestible and meaningful parts. Having discussions with children on how they have displayed resilience by identifying coping skills in response to less complex situations in the past is a good place to start."

Helping their community by donating groceries or raising money for front-line workers is another way that kids can feel empowered rather than helpless.

"Talk with your child about how having empathy ― true caring and love for others ― means that we will also suffer when we feel a loss," Knippenberg said. "Remind them how their worries about others and their feelings of loss come from a place of caring about life. Then remind them that living in a world of love and connectedness is worth the price of suffering."

Model Resilience Yourself

"Mostly you teach your kids this stuff by doing it in front of them," said psychotherapist Noel McDermott. "So if a parent learns resilience techniques and does them, their kids will do it as well."

Parents can demonstrate how they face challenges and frustration head-on and use different coping tactics like meditation, talking to loved ones, making art or playing music.

"We also should model self-care through healthy behaviors," said Victor Carrion, a child and adolescent psychiatrist and director of Stanford University's Early Life Stress and Resilience Program. "For example, by having a healthy diet, good sleep hygiene, not abusing alcohol, tobacco or other drugs, and exercising physically and mentally."

In addition, parents can share family stories about adversity and strength or read books with messages of resilience with their children.

Know It's A Long Road

The past months have been about transition, survival and worry, but much of the mourning over the losses of the pandemic may come later, as we gradually get back to some sense of normalcy.

Knippenberg advised parents to keep these resilience lessons ongoing, pay attention to behavioral changes over time, and consider reaching out to a child mental health professional if needed. Children facing food insecurity, the deaths of loved ones or the loss of a home are extra vulnerable and may require a longer recovery process.

Oriard noted, however, that the long-term effects may not be all negative.

"Talking about resilience and the positive things that can come out of a crisis is not an attempt to paint a happy picture of these times, but to create real, measurable factors that can be gained by coming through a difficult time," she explained. "There is a term emerging in psychology research called 'post-traumatic growth.' It refers to the positive growth that comes after a period of psychological struggle and adversity."

Parents can help their children grow as they move through difficult, unpredictable situations like the current crisis. They may notice their kids become better at coping with boredom, playing independently and adapting to change.

These new skills will help them when lockdown measures get lifted and new challenges present themselves in the transition to our new normal. Children can ultimately thrive while navigating this change if they know they have the love and support of their families and communities.

"Every family is different, and so is every child," Carrion said. "One needs to identify those strengths within ourselves that will help us battle negative thoughts and attitudes. Each family structure is unique, and depending on your family composition and the age of your children, your approach may vary. You do not need to be perfect, and you do not need to do it alone. Remember, it takes a village."

BB14317R.img?h=746&w=1119&m=6&q=60&o=f&l=f&x=3009&y=1349

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER


What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your milli
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Reply #34 posted 07/15/20 11:41am

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Families are sending kids to 'backyard summer camps' during the pandemic. Health officials worry they're not safe.kmclaughlin@businessinsider.com (Kelly McLaughlin) 1 hr ago

Informal backyard summer camps are popping up on New York's Long Island as professional summer camps close amid the novel coronavirus pandemic.
Most of the camps are being run by high school and college students who want to help engage kids while they're stuck at home for the summer.
But the legality and health risks of these camps remain unclear.
The New York Health Department told Insider that all camps need to be registered with the state, and experts told Insider that the camps can be risky health-wise.
Backyard camp organizers told Insider that they're putting safety measures in place to help prevent the spread of COVID-19, and that the first couple weeks have been successful.

Brooke Lewitas, a college junior, was home on New York's Long Island after the coronavirus pandemic shut down George Mason University for the rest of the year.

Her mind turned to the summer. Every year, millions of kids go to overnight and day camps, but the pandemic threw a wrench in those plans.

Lewitas and a friend, Emmie Levy, came up with the idea to start The Camp Girls, where they'd host summer camps in the backyards of suburban Long Island homes instead.

"We kind of knew that there was a big need in the community for childcare, and we saw what other people were doing with these backyard camps," Lewitas told Insider. "We realized that she and I could do it really well — we're a little bit older than a lot of the other girls that are offering it, and we have a lot of experience."

Lewitas and Levy's camp runs Tuesdays and Thursdays from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. They're offering activities like tie-dye, arts and crafts, dance and fitness sessions, relay races, water games and more. They also provide supplies and individually packed snacks for each child, at $50 per child per session, which can be held at a backyard "provided and predetermined by parents."

A quick search through Nassau County-related Facebook groups finds dozens of high school and college students advertising for such camps through vibrant flyers, promising "color wars," sports, arts and crafts, and more.

The camps typically cost around $50 per child per day, with most organizers saying they'd travel to a backyard anywhere in Long Island's Nassau and Suffolk counties and adhere to safety measures parents are comfortable with. Some make parents sign safety waivers, while others plan on checking kids' temperatures while encouraging them to social distance.

It's not clear if these camps are legal. Organizers can bill their informal backyard camps as babysitting, especially if they're conducting one-day sessions. But most nurseries and professional camps have to be licensed for the liability they take on as long-term caretakers, according to New York state's Division of Child Care Services and Department of Health.

Regardless, backyard camp organizers told Insider that their sessions are filling up.

Lewitas told Insider that children are eager for social interaction after months of not seeing friends during the pandemic.

"These kids haven't gone to school and it can be very isolating, so we're really excited to help them reconnect with their friends with a kind of fun," she said.

Most camps are run by high school and college students, who are also stuck home for the summer

© Brooke Lewitas The Camp Girls. This advertisement has been edited by Insider to hide private information. Brooke Lewitas Lewitas led her school's chapter of Camp Kesem, a summer camp for kids whose parents have or have had cancer. Levy was a head counselor at a camp in Pennsylvania and planned to take the job up again this year — before the pandemic hit.

For the camp, they're taking any age group, but most kids who have signed up are between eight and 10. They're taking a minimum of four kids to start a day of activities.

Ahead of each session, Lewitas and Levy are giving campers individual camp kits that include everything they'd need for the day so they wouldn't have to share with others. The kits include snacks to eat throughout the day as well as items needed for crafts and other games.

The two founders, who are based in Syosset, New York, have been practicing social distancing and wearing masks since the start of the pandemic, but Lewitas said that the camp's daily organization is partially up to the parents.

"We definitely want input from parents as to what they feel comfortable," she said. "If they're like, 'You can come inside," we would probably say, 'No thank you,' because it's important to us to have that reputation that we've been good."

They are also considering ways to encourage social distancing between kids at camp, including giving each child a hula hoop to stand in for the day.

© Brooke Lewitas Emmie Levy and Brooke Lewitas. Brooke Lewitas Alyssa Reifer, a high school student in Farmingdale, also on Long Island, is also taking precautions with Revamp Camp, a backyard camp she launched with four friends.

She ordered "Revamp" face masks for the group, and said they're taking kids' temperatures and having families sign waivers to ensure no one's been in contact with anyone who's had COVID-19 in the two weeks leading up to the camp session.

Reifer told Insider that they're only having activities where kids "are safe and having fun at the same time."

"We're also making sure that all our activities are 'COVID-safe,' you could say. None of our activities will have the kids more than 6 feet together," she said. "We're making sure we're not doing activities where they'd be sharing items constantly."

The safety of backyard camps will 'depend on who attends'

Research on children and the coronavirus has drawn renewed attention as the country debates reopening schools in the fall despite the epidemic in the US being orders of magnitude worse than in other developed countries.

Children are at lower risk than adults of contracting the virus, as well as less likely to transmit it to others, though research on the issue remains ongoing.

The safety of each camp will ultimately "depend on who attends," Jessica Justman, an epidemiologist and associate professor of medicine at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, told Insider in an email.

"If the children are all from one family or are already clustering together in one 'bubble,' then the main safety issue to consider will be the organizers/counselors' health as they will be exposed to the children," Justman said. "If the children come from different families and do not normally spend time together, then the safety concerns will expand in proportion to the size of the new 'pod.'"

© Revamp Camp A Revamp Camp advertisement. Insider edited the flyer to protect private information. Revamp Camp Since each camper will go back home at the end of the day, they risk giving the virus to members of their families, Justman said.

"These potential safety concerns are less about the children's health and more about the health of the children's parents and the health of others (e.g., grandparents) as they will be exposed, through their children, to new children attending the camp," she said.

The record so far is a mixed bag.

New York's Department of Education told NPR last month that it had cared for more than 10,000 children at 170 sites throughout the pandemic, primarily for parents who worked on the front lines in what was once the virus's epicenter in the US. The NYDOE told NPR that it has had no reports of coronavirus clusters or outbreaks, and the YMCA, which has cared for thousands of children across the nation during the pandemic, said it hasn't seen outbreaks either.

But professional camps have struggled. In Missouri, one camp for teenagers shut down after more than 80 campers and staffers tested positive for COVID-19.

Yet the demand remains. A recent American Psychological Association survey found that parents thing their children hare having a hard time coping with the pandemic — kids haven't been going to school in person, and haven't been able to socialize with friends as they would normally.

The survey found that 77% of parents are concerned the pandemic has left a long-term impact on their kids, and 60% "have no idea how they are going to keep their child occupied all summer."

One professional camp director says he's concerned about safety protocols at backyard camps

Mark Transport, the president of the Long Island Camps and Private Schools Association as well as the owner of Crestwood Country Day Camp in Melville, New York, is concerned that the safety measures backyard camp organizers are putting in place aren't enough.

He said professional camps go through an "intense amount of scrutiny" and get training on health department protocols and getting licensed and registered.

"I don't think the people who are in these camps understand what kind of liability they have," he told Insider. "If you're running one of these backyard camps, I don't really think that they're doing the health screening, nor do I think they're going to be doing the incredible protocols that registered and licensed camps are doing, in terms of disinfection."

© Provided by INSIDER Children drawing with chalk on pavement. Stephen Simpson/Getty Images In a statement to Insider, Erin Silk, a spokesperson for the New York State Department of Health told Insider that all camps need to be registered with the agency to be in operation. She also said New Yorkers must follow social distancing and avoid large gatherings as part of a statewide executive order.

Justman said that enforcing social distancing could be a challenge at camps especially because different households may have different norms for how they do it. She said organizers should keep groups small and evaluate each child for symptoms.

"Consider who is in your own family and social network and think about how best to protect anyone in your network who is at risk for more severe COVID-19," she said. "This applies to the camp organizers/counselors as well as the parents of the campers."

The backyard camps have already started — and organizers say they've been successful so far

Lewitas told Insider that her backyard camps have already begun, and so far they've been successful. They've had two weeks of camp sessions, and the kids are "excited to get out of the house," Lewitas said.

"It's really important to bring this camp spirit and energy," she told Insider.

Transport told Insider that his day camps on Long Island have been successful too — he's hired a full staff and they've increased health protocols to help prevent the spread of COVID-19.

He issued a camp safety plan online for Crestwood, in which campers and staffers are tested for COVID-19, social distancing has been increased, and adequate PPE materials are on hand.

"A word of the wise to people running these pop-up backyard camps... if everything runs smoothly, God bless them... but that doesn't always happen, especially with kids who are unpredictable," he said.

Read the original article on Insider

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#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER


What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your milli
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Reply #35 posted 07/18/20 2:20pm

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https://case.edu/socialwo...-offerings

COVID-19 Community Offerings

In this time of uncertainty, stress, and trauma, the ability to regulate and to connect with others is more important than ever. Whether it is breathing, moving, drawing, writing, or some other soothing activity, we challenge ourselves and we challenge you to create the time and space to regulate and to do so in the virtual company of others.

Practitioners, teachers, and providers locally and nationally have volunteered their time and their labor to lead our community in a variety of virtual practices, workshops, and classes, free of charge.

COVID-19 Community Offerings | The Center on Trauma and Adversity ...

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER


What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your milli
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Reply #36 posted 07/19/20 5:44am

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Art installation by Mankind Murals thanks essential workers in COVID-19 pandemic

MURAL DISPLAYED ON EXTERIOR WALL OF OHIOHEALTH MANSFIELD HOSPITAL

MANSFIELD — A new art installation at OhioHealth Mansfield Hospital will serve as a thank-you to both the community and the healthcare workers on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic.

On May 23, a large temporary chalk spray paint art mural was installed by Mankind Murals on the exterior wall of OhioHealth Mansfield Hospital, east of the emergency entrance and visible from Glessner Avenue.

The mural, titled "We Flatten The Curve," represents the significance of having flattened the curve for the community’s public health, according to Mankind Murals director Luke Beekman.

"It was a way for us artists to do our part during the pandemic in honoring essential workers," Beekman said.

Beekman reached out to OhioHealth in mid-April about creating an art installation for the hospital. The project immediately got the green light.

“We were excited at this unique opportunity to show appreciation to our associates and providers as well as thank the community for sacrifices they have made to flatten the curve and stay safe,” said Vinson Yates, president of OhioHealth Mansfield and Shelby Hospitals.

Beekman and other local artists then got to work putting together an artistic concept for the piece. Pre-production took approximately six weeks, with Beekman putting in around 50 hours of work.

"I wanted to do something that told a visual story," he said.

Flattening the curve became a central theme to the piece, paired with large artistic profiles of doctors and nurses in front of a long red line of a flattened curve. The image also includes two large roses, a silhouette of the Mansfield hospital, a heart with an electrocardiogram line, a healthy pair of lungs, and a symbol of Ohio highlighting Richland County.

The wraparound exterior wall design is approximately 8 to 10-feet tall and 60-feet wide, comprised of a stencil and spray paint technique. Over 24 layers, spanning over 576 square feet of stencils, were used to create the massive mural project.

The installation itself took 4.5 hours among six volunteers, including Rafael Serrano from Ashland, Jessica Carrick, Robin Shoup, Sam Schneider, and Olivia Busby.

The spray paint technology is a temporary “chalk” spray paint, which will last longer on brick than regular chalk, yet can be removed by power-washing the surface.

"It's chalk spray paint, but it's plaster," Beekman explained. "I did some testing on brick surfaces; since they're more porous, it holds much longer and lasts through weathering. It might last over the next few weeks, time will ultimately tell."

In addition, the stencils were created using a new "wall-drawing robot" called Scribit that created rendered drawings that were then cut by hand to create the stencils. Beekman hopes this new technology paired with the spray paint "chalk" will expand opportunities for public art across Richland County.

Beekman called the mural a celebration of the reopening of Ohio, but with one important caveat.

"We're finally reopening Ohio so the economic impacts will lessen, but we are still in a pandemic," he said. "This is something to celebrate the reopening of Ohio as well as a thank-you to everyone who did their part in helping to flatten the curve."



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#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER


What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your milli
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Reply #37 posted 07/19/20 6:34am

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#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER


What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your milli
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Reply #38 posted 07/19/20 7:52am

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One of my friends did this during the lockdown

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Life Matters
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Reply #39 posted 07/19/20 11:25am

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https://www.msn.com/en-us...d=msedgntp

LA artist donates 1,800 paintings to Brooklyn hospital, one for every employee

By Francesca Giuliani-Hoffman, CNN 10 hrs ago

CNN logoLA artist donates 1,800 paintings to Brooklyn hospital, one for every employee

A hospital in Brooklyn received a special delivery this week during the coronavirus pandemic: A truckload of 1,800 paintings, one for every employee, each representing a flower.

a man standing in a room: Artist Michael Gittes holds a canvas featuring paintings from his "Strangers to No One" series

© Courtesy Taylor Crichton Artist Michael Gittes holds a canvas featuring paintings from his "Strangers to No One" series

The paintings were created and donated by Los Angeles-based artist Michael Gittes, whose works have been shown at The National Portrait Gallery in London, the Park Avenue Armory in New York, and even in the demilitarized zone between North and South Korea.

"At the height of the pandemic, Michael had this brilliant idea to donate a painting to every single employee at a hospital, specifically in New York, because New York was fighting it the hardest," Eli Bronner, Gittes' manager and dealer, told CNN.

Gittes enlisted Bronner to help him find the perfect hospital for the donation.

Based on Gittes' specifications, it had to be a non-profit hospital in an underserved community, with an intensive care unit treating coronavirus patients. It had to be small enough for Gittes to be able to paint a unique, original painting for every single staff member, from the doctors and administrators to the janitors, security guards and cafeteria workers, Bronner said..

They decided that Interfaith Medical Center in Brooklyn's Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood would be the perfect fit for the project.

At the peak of the coronavirus contagion in New York, Interfaith Medical Center was about 90% occupied by patients suffering from coronavirus, hospital CEO LaRay Brown told CNN.

"On April 12, we had 136 patients with Covid-related illnesses," Brown said. "We were essentially a Covid hospital."

The framing and shipment of the paintings across the continent was made possible through funds raised from collectors, according to Bronner. The paintings arrived in Brooklyn on Monday in 40 boxes, and were distributed on Thursday, Brown told CNN.

The hospital community had been informed of the initiative and could preview the paintings in a video that was sent to them.

"When they actually got to touch and see the paintings, it was like Christmas," Interfaith chief financial officer Tracy Green told CNN.

"They just felt like ... they've been working tirelessly the last couple of months and for someone to see that, and just give them a gift, they were just so happy," Green said.

"These flowers are from everyone"

According to Bronner, Gittes wanted to fight the feeling of helplessness caused by the pandemic, and use his art to pay homage to health care workers.

The project, titled "Strangers to No One," is meant to tell the frontline workers that they are loved by the artist and by the world, as they fight this difficult war against the coronavirus.

"You're loved by millions of people you'll never meet. You're not a stranger to anyone. And these flowers are from everyone," Bronner relayed from Gittes.

The acrylic paintings were created using syringes, drawing a connection between the artist and the hospital workers.

"In both cases, they are employing a syringe to help others heal," Bronner told CNN.

Gittes painted a flower for each hospital worker because the workers are themselves like flowers in a garden, supporting all aspects of life, Bronner explained.

By sending art into their homes, Gittes wants to offer them "a moment of peace from the madness," Bronner said.

"I think a lot of people don't realize how mental and physical and emotional this pandemic has been, not only to our medical workers and hospital workers, but to their families," Bronner said.

CEO Brown told CNN she can relate to that feeling.

"Most of us were working seven days a week, 18 hours a day," Brown said.

"We're all dealing with the fact that we're wanting to be cautious and protect our families, and dealing with our personal losses."

Brown lost two relatives to the virus, she told CNN. The virus, she said, "has touched everyone's life."

A moving gift

When first approached about Gittes' intention to donate paintings to each of the workers at Interfaith, Brown said her reaction was skepticism. After all, Gittes is based in Los Angeles and has no connection to Brooklyn.

"It was almost, sort of like, why?" Brown told CNN.

The more the project was discussed, the more Gittes' intentions "really moved all of us," Brown said.

The analogy between the hospital workers and a garden sustaining life really spoke to the staff of the hospital, Brown told CNN. It acknowledges the role not only of the doctors and nurses fighting the virus every day, but also the employees in other departments whose supporting role keeps the hospital operating.

"When you're not on the frontline and you're doing payroll so the nurses can get paid, or you're just paying bills so that we can get our PPE ... they felt so good that they were seen for what they were doing," said Green, the hospital's chief financial officer.

'There's no magic bullet yet'

As hospitalization numbers in New York state continue to drop, on Friday, the number of patients with Covid-related conditions at Interfaith had gone down to 19.

"Thankfully, we can all breathe a little easier now," Brown said.

But in the spring, the situation was much different.

To help quantify the strain put by coronavirus on the hospital's operations, the hospital's chief operations officer Charles Bove said that the number of "e-cylinder" portable oxygen tanks used by the hospital went from 88 per day to more than 200.

The pandemic also lengthened the amount of time patients were in the hospital, which essentially doubled from an average of about five days to about 10 days, Green told CNN.

The hospital is gearing up for a resurgence of cases in the fall and Brown said the staff want people to understand the importance of recommendations like wearing a mask and practicing social distancing.

"If they had seen young people coming in with minor symptoms, and within hours, suddenly not being able to breathe, and within minutes of that, having to be put on intubation, and some people dying, they would not be that irresponsible," Brown said, emphasizing her concern that people will become complacent throughout the summer.

"The least you can do is wear a mask, social distancing, washing your hands," Brown told CNN.

While the pharmaceutical industry races to find a vaccine and strides are being made in treating the virus, Brown said people should use the tools that are proving effective.

"There's no magic bullet yet," she said.

A painting from the "Strangers to No One" project by Michael Gittes.© Courtesy Edward Sohn A painting from the "Strangers to No One" project by Michael Gittes.

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Reply #40 posted 07/19/20 11:25am

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It felt like this in April 2020

CherryMoon57 said:

One of my friends did this during the lockdown

No photo description available.

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Reply #41 posted 07/24/20 6:46am

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An artist painted 1,800 flowers and shipped them across the country to N.Y. hospital hit by covid-19

"I wanted every single employee — all 1,800 — to have a painting to show how much they are loved and appreciated," said Michael Gittes.

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