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Thread started 06/24/20 2:22pm

jjhunsecker

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The world I was raised in...

https://www.nytimes.com/v...test-video


This is the New York I grew up in... yes "liberal" "tolerant" New York...When you knew to keep out of certain neighborhoods, because you could easily end up dead (and a few did). I think especially 2E can relate...I had a few incidents like this in my life

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Reply #1 posted 06/24/20 3:25pm

2elijah

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OMG JJ.. That’s very close to where I grew up/lived 2 towns from there. I know all about Rosedale because I pretty much lived through that experience. Black homes pipe bombed; Blacks chased with baseball bats by racist whites if you walked down any of those streets in Rosedale. Trash deliberately thrown on the lawn of Black residents, who purchased homes there. Happened in the 70s through late 1980s. I think the last protest marches in Rosedale was around 1988-1989, led by Hubert Daughtry, a community activist. There were a lot of Italian families living there, and some Jewish homes also had cross burnings put on their lawns. Many knew the Italian mafia was very present in that community, just like they were in Howard Beach, Queens around that era. The 60s to early 80s was the ‘White Flight’ era in Queens. Where White families were moving out when Black families started purchasing homes there. I’m glad someone brought this story about racism in Rosedale during those days to light.

So many places in Queens were so racist, during that time period. My sister purchased a house there in the early 90s, but relocated to Pennsylvania in the mid 2000s. Rosedale is now a diverse community, mainly Black middle class.
Rosedale is on the borderline of Queens,NYC-Nassau County (Long Island).

Thanks for posting JJ.
Always smile in the face of adversity. smile
#NOFEAR
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Reply #2 posted 06/24/20 5:12pm

jjhunsecker

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2elijah said:

OMG JJ.. That’s very close to where I grew up/lived 2 towns from there. I know all about Rosedale because I pretty much lived through that experience. Black homes pipe bombed; Blacks chased with baseball bats by racist whites if you walked down any of those streets in Rosedale. Trash deliberately thrown on the lawn of Black residents, who purchased homes there. Happened in the 70s through late 1980s. I think the last protest marches in Rosedale was around 1988-1989, led by Hubert Daughtry, a community activist. There were a lot of Italian families living there, and some Jewish homes also had cross burnings put on their lawns. Many knew the Italian mafia was very present in that community, just like they were in Howard Beach, Queens around that era. The 60s to early 80s was the ‘White Flight’ era in Queens. Where White families were moving out when Black families started purchasing homes there. I’m glad someone brought this story about racism in Rosedale during those days to light.

So many places in Queens were so racist, during that time period. My sister purchased a house there in the early 90s, but relocated to Pennsylvania in the mid 2000s. Rosedale is now a diverse community, mainly Black middle class.
Rosedale is on the borderline of Queens,NYC-Nassau County (Long Island).

Thanks for posting JJ.


I had family and friends who lived near Rosedale at that time, and they knew to avoid that area like the plague. There was similar violent and open racism in many parts of Brooklyn at this time as well. It was a crazy time.
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Reply #3 posted 06/24/20 5:31pm

DiminutiveRock
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jjhunsecker said:

2elijah said:
OMG JJ.. That’s very close to where I grew up/lived 2 towns from there. I know all about Rosedale because I pretty much lived through that experience. Black homes pipe bombed; Blacks chased with baseball bats by racist whites if you walked down any of those streets in Rosedale. Trash deliberately thrown on the lawn of Black residents, who purchased homes there. Happened in the 70s through late 1980s. I think the last protest marches in Rosedale was around 1988-1989, led by Hubert Daughtry, a community activist. There were a lot of Italian families living there, and some Jewish homes also had cross burnings put on their lawns. Many knew the Italian mafia was very present in that community, just like they were in Howard Beach, Queens around that era. The 60s to early 80s was the ‘White Flight’ era in Queens. Where White families were moving out when Black families started purchasing homes there. I’m glad someone brought this story about racism in Rosedale during those days to light. So many places in Queens were so racist, during that time period. My sister purchased a house there in the early 90s, but relocated to Pennsylvania in the mid 2000s. Rosedale is now a diverse community, mainly Black middle class. Rosedale is on the borderline of Queens,NYC-Nassau County (Long Island). Thanks for posting JJ.
I had family and friends who lived near Rosedale at that time, and they knew to avoid that area like the plague. There was similar violent and open racism in many parts of Brooklyn at this time as well. It was a crazy time.

Thank you for posting this, JJ hug what an incredibly moving and poignant video. That teacher is a hero - and those students are fortunate that he is exposing them to the truth about the history of that community.

"if your voice held no power, they wouldn't try to silence you."
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Reply #4 posted 06/24/20 6:16pm

2elijah

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jjhunsecker said:

2elijah said:

OMG JJ.. That’s very close to where I grew up/lived 2 towns from there. I know all about Rosedale because I pretty much lived through that experience. Black homes pipe bombed; Blacks chased with baseball bats by racist whites if you walked down any of those streets in Rosedale. Trash deliberately thrown on the lawn of Black residents, who purchased homes there. Happened in the 70s through late 1980s. I think the last protest marches in Rosedale was around 1988-1989, led by Hubert Daughtry, a community activist. There were a lot of Italian families living there, and some Jewish homes also had cross burnings put on their lawns. Many knew the Italian mafia was very present in that community, just like they were in Howard Beach, Queens around that era. The 60s to early 80s was the ‘White Flight’ era in Queens. Where White families were moving out when Black families started purchasing homes there. I’m glad someone brought this story about racism in Rosedale during those days to light.

So many places in Queens were so racist, during that time period. My sister purchased a house there in the early 90s, but relocated to Pennsylvania in the mid 2000s. Rosedale is now a diverse community, mainly Black middle class.
Rosedale is on the borderline of Queens,NYC-Nassau County (Long Island).

Thanks for posting JJ.


I had family and friends who lived near Rosedale at that time, and they knew to avoid that area like the plague. There was similar violent and open racism in many parts of Brooklyn at this time as well. It was a crazy time.

Yes, I remember some of those Brooklyn incidents as well. Then we had to deal with Giuliani in the mid 1990s to early 2000s. He certainly was no help to race relations in NYC, because he was just a carbon copy of today’s trump. What a past. Smh.
Always smile in the face of adversity. smile
#NOFEAR
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Reply #5 posted 06/25/20 8:01am

DiminutiveRock
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I was listening to Howard Stern interview Jon Stewart yesterday and it was really interesting when they talked about 1950s-60s New York when WWII Vets were given VA loans to buy houses but they would not give loans to Black Vets and what long lasting effects that had. It's why projects and ghettos developed.

Stewart noted that it is just one example of a huge inequity that needs to be flushed out of the sytem and rectified completely before true equality can take place. He also cited the example of staffing on The Daily Show and how they finally woke up and looked at their staff of moslty all white males from Ivy League schools - he said on shows like his (Letterman, Conan, etc) you'd usually hire from a pool of interns, but who could afford to intern for 3 months with no pay in NYC? White college kids from wealthy backgrounds. He also said it's not good enough to "even the field" and hire some black men or some women because then they become these tokens, but it does not solve the problem - you have to change the system because that is the only way inequity gets corrected.

"if your voice held no power, they wouldn't try to silence you."
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Reply #6 posted 06/25/20 11:11am

2elijah

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DiminutiveRocker said:

I was listening to Howard Stern interview Jon Stewart yesterday and it was really interesting when they talked about 1950s-60s New York when WWII Vets were given VA loans to buy houses but they would not give loans to Black Vets and what long lasting effects that had. It's why projects and ghettos developed.

Stewart noted that it is just one example of a huge inequity that needs to be flushed out of the sytem and rectified completely before true equality can take place. He also cited the example of staffing on The Daily Show and how they finally woke up and looked at their staff of moslty all white males from Ivy League schools - he said on shows like his (Letterman, Conan, etc) you'd usually hire from a pool of interns, but who could afford to intern for 3 months with no pay in NYC? White college kids from wealthy backgrounds. He also said it's not good enough to "even the field" and hire some black men or some women because then they become these tokens, but it does not solve the problem - you have to change the system because that is the only way inequity gets corrected.


@bolded part - Very true.
Always smile in the face of adversity. smile
#NOFEAR
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Reply #7 posted 06/25/20 11:19am

DiminutiveRock
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2elijah said:

DiminutiveRocker said:

I was listening to Howard Stern interview Jon Stewart yesterday and it was really interesting when they talked about 1950s-60s New York when WWII Vets were given VA loans to buy houses but they would not give loans to Black Vets and what long lasting effects that had. It's why projects and ghettos developed.

Stewart noted that it is just one example of a huge inequity that needs to be flushed out of the sytem and rectified completely before true equality can take place. He also cited the example of staffing on The Daily Show and how they finally woke up and looked at their staff of moslty all white males from Ivy League schools - he said on shows like his (Letterman, Conan, etc) you'd usually hire from a pool of interns, but who could afford to intern for 3 months with no pay in NYC? White college kids from wealthy backgrounds. He also said it's not good enough to "even the field" and hire some black men or some women because then they become these tokens, but it does not solve the problem - you have to change the system because that is the only way inequity gets corrected.

@bolded part - Very true.



These conversations are so important - relating stories and incidents and episodes that are as relevant today as they were back then. Moreso, they illustrate the history of systemic racism in this country.




The system(s) MUST be changed.











[Edited 6/25/20 12:58pm]

"if your voice held no power, they wouldn't try to silence you."
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Reply #8 posted 06/25/20 2:33pm

jjhunsecker

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2elijah said:

jjhunsecker said:
I had family and friends who lived near Rosedale at that time, and they knew to avoid that area like the plague. There was similar violent and open racism in many parts of Brooklyn at this time as well. It was a crazy time.
Yes, I remember some of those Brooklyn incidents as well. Then we had to deal with Giuliani in the mid 1990s to early 2000s. He certainly was no help to race relations in NYC, because he was just a carbon copy of today’s trump. What a past. Smh.

That's why hi, and Trump are so friendly...they share the same mentality ...and morality

[Edited 6/25/20 14:34pm]

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Reply #9 posted 06/25/20 2:40pm

poppys

jjhunsecker said:

2elijah said:

jjhunsecker said: Yes, I remember some of those Brooklyn incidents as well. Then we had to deal with Giuliani in the mid 1990s to early 2000s. He certainly was no help to race relations in NYC, because he was just a carbon copy of today’s trump. What a past. Smh.

That's why hi, and Trump are so friendly...they share the same mentality ...and morality

Such a powerful piece of history. Thanks for posting. Watching the students seeing it is moving.

"if you can't clap on the one, then don't clap at all"
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Reply #10 posted 06/25/20 2:41pm

2elijah

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jjhunsecker said:



2elijah said:


jjhunsecker said:
I had family and friends who lived near Rosedale at that time, and they knew to avoid that area like the plague. There was similar violent and open racism in many parts of Brooklyn at this time as well. It was a crazy time.

Yes, I remember some of those Brooklyn incidents as well. Then we had to deal with Giuliani in the mid 1990s to early 2000s. He certainly was no help to race relations in NYC, because he was just a carbon copy of today’s trump. What a past. Smh.


That's why hi, and Trump are so friendly...they share the same mentality ...and morality

[Edited 6/25/20 14:34pm]


Two rotten peas in a pod.
Always smile in the face of adversity. smile
#NOFEAR
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Reply #11 posted 06/25/20 2:51pm

cborgman

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its painful to hear of, especially as a new yorker of 16 years. but if theres one thing you learn when you live in new york, its manage your expectations. its never gonna be the perfect place you think it is.

a friend of mine who is BK-native once said "man, i wish you had been around back in the day."

i replied "if i had been around back in the day, i would be dead. bitch, im suprised youre alive"

im glad i was sheltered from old NY. it does make me fight that much harder for new NY though.

Power tends to corrupt; absolute power corrupts absolutely. - Lord Acton
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Reply #12 posted 06/25/20 2:51pm

DiminutiveRock
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2elijah said:

jjhunsecker said:

That's why hi, and Trump are so friendly...they share the same mentality ...and morality

[Edited 6/25/20 14:34pm]

Two rotten peas in a pod.


barf

"if your voice held no power, they wouldn't try to silence you."
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Reply #13 posted 06/25/20 3:32pm

jjhunsecker

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cborgman said:

its painful to hear of, especially as a new yorker of 16 years. but if theres one thing you learn when you live in new york, its manage your expectations. its never gonna be the perfect place you think it is.

a friend of mine who is BK-native once said "man, i wish you had been around back in the day."



i replied "if i had been around back in the day, i would be dead. bitch, im suprised youre alive"

im glad i was sheltered from old NY. it does make me fight that much harder for new NY though.



NYC was WILD back then ... in ways both good and bad!
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Reply #14 posted 06/26/20 1:59pm

2elijah

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Yes and I think if people with good hearts continue fighting against racism, and not remain silent about the racial prejudice that continue to exist in this country, then change will only come if we never remain silent about it.
Always smile in the face of adversity. smile
#NOFEAR
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Reply #15 posted 06/26/20 2:50pm

uPtoWnNY

jjhunsecker said:

https://www.nytimes.com/v...test-video


This is the New York I grew up in... yes "liberal" "tolerant" New York...When you knew to keep out of certain neighborhoods, because you could easily end up dead (and a few did). I think especially 2E can relate...I had a few incidents like this in my life

So true, and that includes where my family moved to after leaving the South Bronx, Long Island.

Folks like to hammer the south, but northeast & midwest cities are no different. Remember Dr. King's quote after being attacked in Chicago;

“I’ve been in many demonstrations all across the South, but I can say that I have never seen, even in Mississippi and Alabama, mobs as hostile and as hate-filled as I’m seeing in Chicago.”

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Reply #16 posted 06/26/20 2:52pm

cborgman

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like... the NYers need to have a group lunch. i wanna hear stories of NY and meet yall in person.

,

[Edited 6/26/20 14:52pm]

Power tends to corrupt; absolute power corrupts absolutely. - Lord Acton
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Reply #17 posted 06/26/20 3:14pm

poppys

uPtoWnNY said:

jjhunsecker said:

https://www.nytimes.com/v...test-video


This is the New York I grew up in... yes "liberal" "tolerant" New York...When you knew to keep out of certain neighborhoods, because you could easily end up dead (and a few did). I think especially 2E can relate...I had a few incidents like this in my life

So true, and that includes where my family moved to after leaving the South Bronx, Long Island.

Folks like to hammer the south, but northeast & midwest cities are no different. Remember Dr. King's quote after being attacked in Chicago;

“I’ve been in many demonstrations all across the South, but I can say that I have never seen, even in Mississippi and Alabama, mobs as hostile and as hate-filled as I’m seeing in Chicago.”

nod I wish more people could understand that.

I've told this before. When I moved to Bklyn (8th & 8th) in 1980, the deli guys across the street from my apt regularly threatened black guys walking down the "wrong" street with baseball bats. BUT there was a lunch time period where black people could buy sandwiches.

When I moved to Ave B & 14 st in Manhattan in 1982, the weapon of choice in my neighborhood was an open carry golf club. I saw someone get bludgeoned with a giant 2 x 4 on 14th st at Union Square one night. Brutal. Oh, I got more too. Just extreme violence on the streets.

"if you can't clap on the one, then don't clap at all"
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Reply #18 posted 06/26/20 3:20pm

cborgman

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poppys said:

uPtoWnNY said:

So true, and that includes where my family moved to after leaving the South Bronx, Long Island.

Folks like to hammer the south, but northeast & midwest cities are no different. Remember Dr. King's quote after being attacked in Chicago;

“I’ve been in many demonstrations all across the South, but I can say that I have never seen, even in Mississippi and Alabama, mobs as hostile and as hate-filled as I’m seeing in Chicago.”

nod I wish more people could understand that.

I've told this before. When I moved to Bklyn (8th & 8th) in 1980, the deli guys across the street from my apt regularly threatened black guys walking down the "wrong" street with baseball bats. BUT there was a lunch time period where black people could buy sandwiches.

When I moved to Ave B & 14 st in Manhattan in 1982, the weapon of choice in my neighborhood was an open carry golf club. I saw someone get bludgeoned with a giant 2 x 4 on 14th st at Union Square one night. Brutal. Oh, I got more too. Just extreme violence on the streets.

jesus

Power tends to corrupt; absolute power corrupts absolutely. - Lord Acton
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Reply #19 posted 06/26/20 3:33pm

poppys

jjhunsecker said:

cborgman said:

its painful to hear of, especially as a new yorker of 16 years. but if theres one thing you learn when you live in new york, its manage your expectations. its never gonna be the perfect place you think it is.

a friend of mine who is BK-native once said "man, i wish you had been around back in the day."

i replied "if i had been around back in the day, i would be dead. bitch, im suprised youre alive"

im glad i was sheltered from old NY. it does make me fight that much harder for new NY though.



NYC was WILD back then ... in ways both good and bad!



TRUE & TRUE

"if you can't clap on the one, then don't clap at all"
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Reply #20 posted 06/26/20 4:20pm

benni

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jjhunsecker said:

https://www.nytimes.com/v...test-video


This is the New York I grew up in... yes "liberal" "tolerant" New York...When you knew to keep out of certain neighborhoods, because you could easily end up dead (and a few did). I think especially 2E can relate...I had a few incidents like this in my life


bawl Seeing them as children, broke my heart, and seeing that it was other kids treating them that way... That was a devastating video. But seeing them as adults, now, and I could see so many of my clients today, in their eyes. It just hurt watching that. I have certain clients who are brutally honest with me about racism, about what they've experienced in their lifetimes, and I feel so honored that they share their experiences with me, feel safe with me to share their experiences, but like the little girl said, "You can't take the hurt back". I have one client who I checked on after George Floyd was killed. I knew she would be deeply hurt because she lost a family member to racism. When I called her she cried on the phone with me for over an hour, talking about how this continues to haunt her, how hard it is, how hurt she is because nothing has changed since she lost her brother. She said what hurt most of all was the hope of Obama, that maybe things had changed, that she had finally seen a black president, only to have that hope crash and burn when Trump was elected, and that was when she realized that nothing had changed at all. I really wanted to drive there and give her a big hug, so I made her a promise, when they finally let us go out and do visits in the home again, she'd be getting the biggest, hardest hug from me.

jj, sweetheart, you know I adore you. I'm so sorry that you had to endure any incidents like this. That anyone has ever had to. I know I keep saying this, but it's just not right, not right at all.

@GeorgeTrue1 -- Alex's Jones's Razor - it's not that sharp
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Reply #21 posted 06/26/20 4:33pm

poppys

heart your post benni

The way they talked about the flag, and how they saw it and turned down the street thinking it was inviting, is especially heartbreaking. I agree, watching the emotion in the adults who participated choked me up too. Thanks to them for witnessing so eloquently after all these years.

"if you can't clap on the one, then don't clap at all"
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Reply #22 posted 06/26/20 4:39pm

cborgman

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this is secretly THE best thread in p&r

Power tends to corrupt; absolute power corrupts absolutely. - Lord Acton
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Reply #23 posted 06/27/20 12:03am

jjhunsecker

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poppys said:



uPtoWnNY said:




jjhunsecker said:


https://www.nytimes.com/v...test-video





This is the New York I grew up in... yes "liberal" "tolerant" New York...When you knew to keep out of certain neighborhoods, because you could easily end up dead (and a few did). I think especially 2E can relate...I had a few incidents like this in my life




So true, and that includes where my family moved to after leaving the South Bronx, Long Island.



Folks like to hammer the south, but northeast & midwest cities are no different. Remember Dr. King's quote after being attacked in Chicago;



“I’ve been in many demonstrations all across the South, but I can say that I have never seen, even in Mississippi and Alabama, mobs as hostile and as hate-filled as I’m seeing in Chicago.”





nod I wish more people could understand that.

I've told this before. When I moved to Bklyn (8th & 8th) in 1980, the deli guys across the street from my apt regularly threatened black guys walking down the "wrong" street with baseball bats. BUT there was a lunch time period where black people could buy sandwiches.

When I moved to Ave B & 14 st in Manhattan in 1982, the weapon of choice in my neighborhood was an open carry golf club. I saw someone get bludgeoned with a giant 2 x 4 on 14th st at Union Square one night. Brutal. Oh, I got more too. Just extreme violence on the streets.



A lot of the Italian-American guys I knew from school always kept a baseball bat handy. I picked up that habit as well and used to have a bat right beside my bed... you never know when you might need one
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Reply #24 posted 06/27/20 12:17am

jjhunsecker

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benni said:



jjhunsecker said:


https://www.nytimes.com/v...test-video





This is the New York I grew up in... yes "liberal" "tolerant" New York...When you knew to keep out of certain neighborhoods, because you could easily end up dead (and a few did). I think especially 2E can relate...I had a few incidents like this in my life




bawl Seeing them as children, broke my heart, and seeing that it was other kids treating them that way... That was a devastating video. But seeing them as adults, now, and I could see so many of my clients today, in their eyes. It just hurt watching that. I have certain clients who are brutally honest with me about racism, about what they've experienced in their lifetimes, and I feel so honored that they share their experiences with me, feel safe with me to share their experiences, but like the little girl said, "You can't take the hurt back". I have one client who I checked on after George Floyd was killed. I knew she would be deeply hurt because she lost a family member to racism. When I called her she cried on the phone with me for over an hour, talking about how this continues to haunt her, how hard it is, how hurt she is because nothing has changed since she lost her brother. She said what hurt most of all was the hope of Obama, that maybe things had changed, that she had finally seen a black president, only to have that hope crash and burn when Trump was elected, and that was when she realized that nothing had changed at all. I really wanted to drive there and give her a big hug, so I made her a promise, when they finally let us go out and do visits in the home again, she'd be getting the biggest, hardest hug from me.

jj, sweetheart, you know I adore you. I'm so sorry that you had to endure any incidents like this. That anyone has ever had to. I know I keep saying this, but it's just not right, not right at all.



Thanks so much Benni. I always appreciate your insights... what you tell us about the people you serve, it’s often heart wrenching. A lot of things like this stick with a person, even if it’s unconscious.
For me, I consider incidents like this, when they happened to me, or people I know, these are part of what has made me what I am today- for better or for worse LOL... Ir certainly helped to make me aware of my surroundings at all times, and keeping my guard up
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Reply #25 posted 06/27/20 4:21am

2elijah

avatar

jjhunsecker said:

benni said:



jjhunsecker said:


https://www.nytimes.com/v...test-video





This is the New York I grew up in... yes "liberal" "tolerant" New York...When you knew to keep out of certain neighborhoods, because you could easily end up dead (and a few did). I think especially 2E can relate...I had a few incidents like this in my life




bawl Seeing them as children, broke my heart, and seeing that it was other kids treating them that way... That was a devastating video. But seeing them as adults, now, and I could see so many of my clients today, in their eyes. It just hurt watching that. I have certain clients who are brutally honest with me about racism, about what they've experienced in their lifetimes, and I feel so honored that they share their experiences with me, feel safe with me to share their experiences, but like the little girl said, "You can't take the hurt back". I have one client who I checked on after George Floyd was killed. I knew she would be deeply hurt because she lost a family member to racism. When I called her she cried on the phone with me for over an hour, talking about how this continues to haunt her, how hard it is, how hurt she is because nothing has changed since she lost her brother. She said what hurt most of all was the hope of Obama, that maybe things had changed, that she had finally seen a black president, only to have that hope crash and burn when Trump was elected, and that was when she realized that nothing had changed at all. I really wanted to drive there and give her a big hug, so I made her a promise, when they finally let us go out and do visits in the home again, she'd be getting the biggest, hardest hug from me.

jj, sweetheart, you know I adore you. I'm so sorry that you had to endure any incidents like this. That anyone has ever had to. I know I keep saying this, but it's just not right, not right at all.



Thanks so much Benni. I always appreciate your insights... what you tell us about the people you serve, it’s often heart wrenching. A lot of things like this stick with a person, even if it’s unconscious.
For me, I consider incidents like this, when they happened to me, or people I know, these are part of what has made me what I am today- for better or for worse LOL... Ir certainly helped to make me aware of my surroundings at all times, and keeping my guard up



That video brings back memories of when my youngest brother, who was 8 yrs old and was teased by a white girl in his class, with racist taunts. She kept calling him ‘Darky’. So one day he told her he will tell the teacher, and she threatened him. So he got up from his chair to tell the teacher, and that little girl took a pen and stabbed him in his face. It went through to his adenoids. The damage affected his speech after that. My parents were so angry, and went to the school. The school tried to contact the girl’s family the next day, but it turns out, they couldn’t be located because they moved. The damage affected my brother’s speech thereafter. This is what hate can do to people, when parents and society teaches a a child hate. This is why it’s important to expose racism/racist acts and educate people about the effects of racism.

Unfortunately, there are those who choose to turn a blind eye to racism, and would rather silence the brave ones who expose it. Well I say to those cowards and bullies, that they are the contributors to keeping the system of racism alive. I have no respect for folks like that, because they have no soul. I applaud and respect the courageous people who do not fear exposing racism, and standing up against racial injustices/inequalities and racial abuses.

We do not need more Dylan Roofs or Chauvins in this world, imposing their evil on innocent people. No matter how long it takes, I will never stop raising awareness or speaking out against racism. I’ve marched in protests against police brutality and racial injustices throughout my lifetime. I really hope the recent protests have helped to open the eyes of those who have been asleep in their privileges over the years, and finally opened their eyes to the ugly truths and reality of the effects racism has done to many in society. It will still take a while for more change to come, but if those who support racism don’t want to hear people complaining about it, then stop being cowards by supporting it, and trying to silence the brave ones who expose it and choose to see it eradicated.
Always smile in the face of adversity. smile
#NOFEAR
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Reply #26 posted 06/27/20 4:25am

cborgman

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2elijah said:

jjhunsecker said:
Thanks so much Benni. I always appreciate your insights... what you tell us about the people you serve, it’s often heart wrenching. A lot of things like this stick with a person, even if it’s unconscious. For me, I consider incidents like this, when they happened to me, or people I know, these are part of what has made me what I am today- for better or for worse LOL... Ir certainly helped to make me aware of my surroundings at all times, and keeping my guard up
That video brings back memories of when my youngest brother, who was 8 yrs old and was teased by a white girl in his class, with racist taunts. She kept calling him ‘Darky’. So one day he told her he will tell the teacher, and she threatened him. So he got up from his chair to tell the teacher, and that little girl took a pen and stabbed him in his face. It went through to his adenoids. The damage affected his speech after that. My parents were so angry, and went to the school. The school tried to contact the girl’s family the next day, but it turns out, they couldn’t be located because they moved. The damage affected my brother’s speech thereafter. This is what hate can do to people, when parents and society teaches a a child hate. This is why it’s important to expose racism/racist acts and educate people about the effects of racism. Unfortunately, there are those who choose to turn a blind eye to racism, and would rather silence the brave ones who expose it. Well I say to those cowards and bullies, that they are the contributors to keeping the system of racism alive. I have no respect for folks like that, because they have no soul. I applaud and respect the courageous people who do not fear exposing racism, and standing up against racial injustices/inequalities and racial abuses. We do not need more Dylan Roofs or Chauvins in this world, imposing their evil on innocent people. No matter how long it takes, I will never stop raising awareness or speaking out against racism. I’ve marched in protests against police brutality and racial injustices throughout my lifetime. I really hope the recent protests have helped to open the eyes of those who have been asleep in their privileges over the years, and finally opened their eyes to the ugly truths and reality of the effects racism has done to many in society. It will still take a while for more change to come, but if those who support racism don’t want to hear people complaining about it, then stop being cowards by supporting it, and trying to silence the brave ones who expose it and choose to see it eradicated.

omg... your poor brother.
how is he nowdays?

Power tends to corrupt; absolute power corrupts absolutely. - Lord Acton
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Reply #27 posted 06/27/20 4:35am

2elijah

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cborgman said:



2elijah said:


jjhunsecker said:
Thanks so much Benni. I always appreciate your insights... what you tell us about the people you serve, it’s often heart wrenching. A lot of things like this stick with a person, even if it’s unconscious. For me, I consider incidents like this, when they happened to me, or people I know, these are part of what has made me what I am today- for better or for worse LOL... Ir certainly helped to make me aware of my surroundings at all times, and keeping my guard up

That video brings back memories of when my youngest brother, who was 8 yrs old and was teased by a white girl in his class, with racist taunts. She kept calling him ‘Darky’. So one day he told her he will tell the teacher, and she threatened him. So he got up from his chair to tell the teacher, and that little girl took a pen and stabbed him in his face. It went through to his adenoids. The damage affected his speech after that. My parents were so angry, and went to the school. The school tried to contact the girl’s family the next day, but it turns out, they couldn’t be located because they moved. The damage affected my brother’s speech thereafter. This is what hate can do to people, when parents and society teaches a a child hate. This is why it’s important to expose racism/racist acts and educate people about the effects of racism. Unfortunately, there are those who choose to turn a blind eye to racism, and would rather silence the brave ones who expose it. Well I say to those cowards and bullies, that they are the contributors to keeping the system of racism alive. I have no respect for folks like that, because they have no soul. I applaud and respect the courageous people who do not fear exposing racism, and standing up against racial injustices/inequalities and racial abuses. We do not need more Dylan Roofs or Chauvins in this world, imposing their evil on innocent people. No matter how long it takes, I will never stop raising awareness or speaking out against racism. I’ve marched in protests against police brutality and racial injustices throughout my lifetime. I really hope the recent protests have helped to open the eyes of those who have been asleep in their privileges over the years, and finally opened their eyes to the ugly truths and reality of the effects racism has done to many in society. It will still take a while for more change to come, but if those who support racism don’t want to hear people complaining about it, then stop being cowards by supporting it, and trying to silence the brave ones who expose it and choose to see it eradicated.

omg... your poor brother.
how is he nowdays?



Thanks for asking. He’s doing fine. The damage affected his speech but he never held any hate towards anyone because of it. He’s married and has 4 children. I don’t think he ever told his children what happened to him. I have seen him go through a lot. Even when he had to go through white neighborhoods on his way to job interviews, he was chased by White guys with a bat. He’s been through a lot, with prejudice, but he still didn’t hold any hate in his heart because of what happened to him.

He saw any incident individually, and didn’t blame all White people for what happened to him. We grew up in a diverse community, and our White neighbors on my block, before they too eventually moved, one by one, never gave us any problems. My parents didn’t raise us to hate nor did they even discuss racism, even though they knew it existed, but they were devastated when that incident happened to my brother.

This is why it’s important to not teach children hate, because they will go out one day and practice what they’ve been taught on other children, as you’ve seen in that video. I only lived two towns from Rosedale growing up, and witnessed what those kids experienced, but life had to go on regardless, because their hatred wasn’t mine, it was the hate their parents and society taught them.
[Edited 6/27/20 4:46am]
Always smile in the face of adversity. smile
#NOFEAR
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Reply #28 posted 06/27/20 4:39am

poppys

2elijah said:

jjhunsecker said:
Thanks so much Benni. I always appreciate your insights... what you tell us about the people you serve, it’s often heart wrenching. A lot of things like this stick with a person, even if it’s unconscious. For me, I consider incidents like this, when they happened to me, or people I know, these are part of what has made me what I am today- for better or for worse LOL... Ir certainly helped to make me aware of my surroundings at all times, and keeping my guard up
That video brings back memories of when my youngest brother, who was 8 yrs old and was teased by a white girl in his class, with racist taunts. She kept calling him ‘Darky’. So one day he told her he will tell the teacher, and she threatened him. So he got up from his chair to tell the teacher, and that little girl took a pen and stabbed him in his face. It went through to his adenoids. The damage affected his speech after that. My parents were so angry, and went to the school. The school tried to contact the girl’s family the next day, but it turns out, they couldn’t be located because they moved. The damage affected my brother’s speech thereafter. This is what hate can do to people, when parents and society teaches a a child hate. This is why it’s important to expose racism/racist acts and educate people about the effects of racism.

Unfortunately, there are those who choose to turn a blind eye to racism, and would rather silence the brave ones who expose it. Well I say to those cowards and bullies, that they are the contributors to keeping the system of racism alive. I have no respect for folks like that, because they have no soul. I applaud and respect the courageous people who do not fear exposing racism, and standing up against racial injustices/inequalities and racial abuses.

We do not need more Dylan Roofs or Chauvins in this world, imposing their evil on innocent people. No matter how long it takes, I will never stop raising awareness or speaking out against racism. I’ve marched in protests against police brutality and racial injustices throughout my lifetime. I really hope the recent protests have helped to open the eyes of those who have been asleep in their privileges over the years, and finally opened their eyes to the ugly truths and reality of the effects racism has done to many in society. It will still take a while for more change to come, but if those who support racism don’t want to hear people complaining about it, then stop being cowards by supporting it, and trying to silence the brave ones who expose it and choose to see it eradicated.

What a great post. You really are a good writer 2e.

The story about your brother breaks my heart. Children so young being that racist - AND - she also knew that it was wrong because she stabbed him when he went to tell the teacher. Wow, that's just a microcosm of the sickness.

"if you can't clap on the one, then don't clap at all"
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Reply #29 posted 06/27/20 4:46am

cborgman

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2elijah said:

cborgman said:

omg... your poor brother.
how is he nowdays?

Thanks for asking. He’s doing fine. The damage affected his speech but he never held any hate towards anyone because of it. He’s married and has 4 children. I don’t think he ever told his children what happened to him. I have seen him go through a lot. Even when he had to go through white neighborhoods on his way to job interviews, he was chased by White guys with a bat. He’s been through a lot, with prejudice, but he still didn’t hold any hate in his heart because of what happened to him. He saw any incident individually, and didn’t blame all White people for what happened to him. We grew up in a diverse community, and our White neighbors on my block, before they too eventually moved, one by one, never gave us any problems. My parents didn’t raise us to hate nor did they even discuss racism, even though they knew it existed, but they were devastated when that incident happened to my brother. This is why it’s important to not teach children hate, because they will go out one day and practice what they’ve been taught on other children, as you’ve seen in that video. I only lived two towns from Rosedale growing up, and witnessed what those kids experienced, but life had to go on regardless, because their hatred wasn’t mine, it was the hate their parents and society taught them. [Edited 6/27/20 4:38am]

omg, what an incredible post. thank you for sharing it with us.

Power tends to corrupt; absolute power corrupts absolutely. - Lord Acton
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