independent and unofficial
Prince fan community
Forum jump
Forums > Politics & Religion > The world I was raised in...
« Previous topic  Next topic »
Page 2 of 2 <12
Reply   New topic   Printable     (Log in to 'subscribe' to this topic)
Reply #30 posted 06/27/20 4:49am

2elijah

avatar

cborgman said:



2elijah said:


cborgman said:


omg... your poor brother.
how is he nowdays?



Thanks for asking. He’s doing fine. The damage affected his speech but he never held any hate towards anyone because of it. He’s married and has 4 children. I don’t think he ever told his children what happened to him. I have seen him go through a lot. Even when he had to go through white neighborhoods on his way to job interviews, he was chased by White guys with a bat. He’s been through a lot, with prejudice, but he still didn’t hold any hate in his heart because of what happened to him. He saw any incident individually, and didn’t blame all White people for what happened to him. We grew up in a diverse community, and our White neighbors on my block, before they too eventually moved, one by one, never gave us any problems. My parents didn’t raise us to hate nor did they even discuss racism, even though they knew it existed, but they were devastated when that incident happened to my brother. This is why it’s important to not teach children hate, because they will go out one day and practice what they’ve been taught on other children, as you’ve seen in that video. I only lived two towns from Rosedale growing up, and witnessed what those kids experienced, but life had to go on regardless, because their hatred wasn’t mine, it was the hate their parents and society taught them. [Edited 6/27/20 4:38am]

omg, what an incredible post. thank you for sharing it with us.


Thanks cborg. I don’t normally talk about that incident, but when JJ posted that video, it brought back memories of that era.
Always smile in the face of adversity. smile
#NOFEAR
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #31 posted 06/27/20 4:59am

cborgman

avatar

2elijah said:

cborgman said:

omg, what an incredible post. thank you for sharing it with us.

Thanks cborg. I don’t normally talk about that incident, but when JJ posted that video, it brought back memories of that era.

no, thank you.

i dont want to say i love hearing these stories, as they are painful to hear. but theyre important to hear, and i want to hear them.

thank you for sharing.

Power tends to corrupt; absolute power corrupts absolutely. - Lord Acton
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #32 posted 06/27/20 5:08am

2elijah

avatar

cborgman said:



2elijah said:


cborgman said:


omg, what an incredible post. thank you for sharing it with us.



Thanks cborg. I don’t normally talk about that incident, but when JJ posted that video, it brought back memories of that era.

no, thank you.

i dont want to say i love hearing these stories, as they are painful to hear. but theyre important to hear, and i want to hear them.

thank you for sharing.


You’re welcome. hug
Always smile in the face of adversity. smile
#NOFEAR
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #33 posted 06/27/20 6:34am

2elijah

avatar

poppys said:



2elijah said:


jjhunsecker said:
Thanks so much Benni. I always appreciate your insights... what you tell us about the people you serve, it’s often heart wrenching. A lot of things like this stick with a person, even if it’s unconscious. For me, I consider incidents like this, when they happened to me, or people I know, these are part of what has made me what I am today- for better or for worse LOL... Ir certainly helped to make me aware of my surroundings at all times, and keeping my guard up

That video brings back memories of when my youngest brother, who was 8 yrs old and was teased by a white girl in his class, with racist taunts. She kept calling him ‘Darky’. So one day he told her he will tell the teacher, and she threatened him. So he got up from his chair to tell the teacher, and that little girl took a pen and stabbed him in his face. It went through to his adenoids. The damage affected his speech after that. My parents were so angry, and went to the school. The school tried to contact the girl’s family the next day, but it turns out, they couldn’t be located because they moved. The damage affected my brother’s speech thereafter. This is what hate can do to people, when parents and society teaches a a child hate. This is why it’s important to expose racism/racist acts and educate people about the effects of racism.

Unfortunately, there are those who choose to turn a blind eye to racism, and would rather silence the brave ones who expose it. Well I say to those cowards and bullies, that they are the contributors to keeping the system of racism alive. I have no respect for folks like that, because they have no soul. I applaud and respect the courageous people who do not fear exposing racism, and standing up against racial injustices/inequalities and racial abuses.

We do not need more Dylan Roofs or Chauvins in this world, imposing their evil on innocent people. No matter how long it takes, I will never stop raising awareness or speaking out against racism. I’ve marched in protests against police brutality and racial injustices throughout my lifetime. I really hope the recent protests have helped to open the eyes of those who have been asleep in their privileges over the years, and finally opened their eyes to the ugly truths and reality of the effects racism has done to many in society. It will still take a while for more change to come, but if those who support racism don’t want to hear people complaining about it, then stop being cowards by supporting it, and trying to silence the brave ones who expose it and choose to see it eradicated.


What a great post. You really are a good writer 2e.

The story about your brother breaks my heart. Children so young being that racist - AND - she also knew that it was wrong because she stabbed him when he went to tell the teacher. Wow, that's just a microcosm of the sickness.


Thanks Poppy, appreciate it. When you look at the vid JJ posted, it’s clear those kids learned that behavior from their parents.
Always smile in the face of adversity. smile
#NOFEAR
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #34 posted 06/27/20 10:12am

jjhunsecker

avatar

2elijah said:

poppys said:



2elijah said:


jjhunsecker said:
Thanks so much Benni. I always appreciate your insights... what you tell us about the people you serve, it’s often heart wrenching. A lot of things like this stick with a person, even if it’s unconscious. For me, I consider incidents like this, when they happened to me, or people I know, these are part of what has made me what I am today- for better or for worse LOL... Ir certainly helped to make me aware of my surroundings at all times, and keeping my guard up

That video brings back memories of when my youngest brother, who was 8 yrs old and was teased by a white girl in his class, with racist taunts. She kept calling him ‘Darky’. So one day he told her he will tell the teacher, and she threatened him. So he got up from his chair to tell the teacher, and that little girl took a pen and stabbed him in his face. It went through to his adenoids. The damage affected his speech after that. My parents were so angry, and went to the school. The school tried to contact the girl’s family the next day, but it turns out, they couldn’t be located because they moved. The damage affected my brother’s speech thereafter. This is what hate can do to people, when parents and society teaches a a child hate. This is why it’s important to expose racism/racist acts and educate people about the effects of racism.

Unfortunately, there are those who choose to turn a blind eye to racism, and would rather silence the brave ones who expose it. Well I say to those cowards and bullies, that they are the contributors to keeping the system of racism alive. I have no respect for folks like that, because they have no soul. I applaud and respect the courageous people who do not fear exposing racism, and standing up against racial injustices/inequalities and racial abuses.

We do not need more Dylan Roofs or Chauvins in this world, imposing their evil on innocent people. No matter how long it takes, I will never stop raising awareness or speaking out against racism. I’ve marched in protests against police brutality and racial injustices throughout my lifetime. I really hope the recent protests have helped to open the eyes of those who have been asleep in their privileges over the years, and finally opened their eyes to the ugly truths and reality of the effects racism has done to many in society. It will still take a while for more change to come, but if those who support racism don’t want to hear people complaining about it, then stop being cowards by supporting it, and trying to silence the brave ones who expose it and choose to see it eradicated.


What a great post. You really are a good writer 2e.

The story about your brother breaks my heart. Children so young being that racist - AND - she also knew that it was wrong because she stabbed him when he went to tell the teacher. Wow, that's just a microcosm of the sickness.


Thanks Poppy, appreciate it. When you look at the vid JJ posted, it’s clear those kids learned that behavior from their parents.


It’s definitely learned behavior, from in the home and their surroundings. It becomes the culture of the community
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #35 posted 06/27/20 10:14am

cborgman

avatar

jjhunsecker said:

2elijah said:
Thanks Poppy, appreciate it. When you look at the vid JJ posted, it’s clear those kids learned that behavior from their parents.
It’s definitely learned behavior, from in the home and their surroundings. It becomes the culture of the community

not just from parents, not just locally.

its become very obvious to me how systematically its built in and learned at that level. in tv, in ads, in movies, in schools... its taught on every level.



.



[Edited 6/27/20 10:15am]

Power tends to corrupt; absolute power corrupts absolutely. - Lord Acton
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #36 posted 06/27/20 12:35pm

DiminutiveRock
er

avatar

cborgman said:

jjhunsecker said:

2elijah said: It’s definitely learned behavior, from in the home and their surroundings. It becomes the culture of the community

not just from parents, not just locally.

its become very obvious to me how systematically its built in and learned at that level. in tv, in ads, in movies, in schools... its taught on every level.



.



[Edited 6/27/20 10:15am]


nod I tested as gifted kid when I was very young, 3rd grade or so. We lived in a 95% white suburb of LA - my parents bought our home brand new. I could count on one hand all the Mexican, Asian and Black kids in my classes. When I got to Jr High I was placed in an English class that was almost remedial - we had no books, just brought pencils to class and in it had that handful of Mexican and black kids. My gifted class was my social studiies class and my teacher, who had this bright red hair and a strong NY accent, asked to see each of our class schedules. When she saw my English class she marched into the principal's office and showed him my test scores and immediately demanded that I be moved into her higher level English class. She called my parents to tell them what she was doing and apologized for my being misplaced. The first thing out of my older brother's mouth was "they put her in that class because she is Mexican, even though she is identified as gifted and her scores were high" That was my first experience with the "system." I was very fortunate, and that teacher holds a special place in my memory - - but imagine all those other kids who tested fairly well but because of their names or how they looked were treated like lesser than students and placed in classes that did not challenge them or increase their learning abilities. People just defaulted to the school "authorities" to know better. Fucked up.

"if your voice held no power, they wouldn't try to silence you."
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #37 posted 06/27/20 12:41pm

2elijah

avatar

DiminutiveRocker said:



cborgman said:




jjhunsecker said:


2elijah said: It’s definitely learned behavior, from in the home and their surroundings. It becomes the culture of the community

not just from parents, not just locally.

its become very obvious to me how systematically its built in and learned at that level. in tv, in ads, in movies, in schools... its taught on every level.



.




[Edited 6/27/20 10:15am]




nod I tested as gifted kid when I was very young, 3rd grade or so. We lived in a 95% white suburb of LA - my parents bought our home brand new. I could count on one hand all the Mexican, Asian and Black kids in my classes. When I got to Jr High I was placed in an English class that was almost remedial - we had no books, just brought pencils to class and in it had that handful of Mexican and black kids. My gifted class was my social studiies class and my teacher, who had this bright red hair and a strong NY accent, asked to see each of our class schedules. When she saw my English class she marched into the principal's office and showed him my test scores and immediately demanded that I be moved into her higher level English class. She called my parents to tell them what she was doing and apologized for my being misplaced. The first thing out of my older brother's mouth was "they put her in that class because she is Mexican, even though she is identified as gifted and her scores were high" That was my first experience with the "system." I was very fortunate, and that teacher holds a special place in my memory - - but imagine all those other kids who tested fairly well but because of their names or how they looked were treated like lesser than students and placed in classes that did not challenge them or increase their learning abilities. People just defaulted to the school "authorities" to know better. Fucked up.


Yes, happens all the time. I’m glad that teacher made sure you were moved to a class you should have been correctly placed in, in the first place.
Always smile in the face of adversity. smile
#NOFEAR
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #38 posted 06/27/20 12:42pm

2elijah

avatar

jjhunsecker said:

2elijah said:


Thanks Poppy, appreciate it. When you look at the vid JJ posted, it’s clear those kids learned that behavior from their parents.


It’s definitely learned behavior, from in the home and their surroundings. It becomes the culture of the community

Definitely. nod
[Edited 6/27/20 12:42pm]
Always smile in the face of adversity. smile
#NOFEAR
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #39 posted 06/27/20 12:44pm

cborgman

avatar

DiminutiveRocker said:

cborgman said:

not just from parents, not just locally.

its become very obvious to me how systematically its built in and learned at that level. in tv, in ads, in movies, in schools... its taught on every level.



.



[Edited 6/27/20 10:15am]


nod I tested as gifted kid when I was very young, 3rd grade or so. We lived in a 95% white suburb of LA - my parents bought our home brand new. I could count on one hand all the Mexican, Asian and Black kids in my classes. When I got to Jr High I was placed in an English class that was almost remedial - we had no books, just brought pencils to class and in it had that handful of Mexican and black kids. My gifted class was my social studiies class and my teacher, who had this bright red hair and a strong NY accent, asked to see each of our class schedules. When she saw my English class she marched into the principal's office and showed him my test scores and immediately demanded that I be moved into her higher level English class. She called my parents to tell them what she was doing and apologized for my being misplaced. The first thing out of my older brother's mouth was "they put her in that class because she is Mexican, even though she is identified as gifted and her scores were high" That was my first experience with the "system." I was very fortunate, and that teacher holds a special place in my memory - - but imagine all those other kids who tested fairly well but because of their names or how they looked were treated like lesser than students and placed in classes that did not challenge them or increase their learning abilities. People just defaulted to the school "authorities" to know better. Fucked up.

yea, sadly that doesnt surprise me. thank you for sharing.

Power tends to corrupt; absolute power corrupts absolutely. - Lord Acton
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #40 posted 06/27/20 1:23pm

DiminutiveRock
er

avatar

2elijah said:

jjhunsecker said:
It’s definitely learned behavior, from in the home and their surroundings. It becomes the culture of the community
Definitely. nod [Edited 6/27/20 12:42pm]


The shift in culture has to happen. Is happening.



Anyone seeing what's happening in Branson, MO?

Protesters have been gathering outside a strip mall store Dixie Outfitters, which specializes in Confederate flags, clothing and other merchandise. The protests have drawn people from opposing sides of the debate — Black Lives Matter demonstrators, as well as those who support the store and the Confederate flag.



https://www.kansascity.com/entertainment/article243763112.html


Of course counter protesters showed up with the confed flags....and guns. neutral
"if your voice held no power, they wouldn't try to silence you."
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #41 posted 06/28/20 6:17am

uPtoWnNY

There was a silver lining to all the bs I dealt with in my younger years (from racists and ignorant blacks who called me white for getting good grades in school )....it toughened me up, enabled me to survive NYC. and taught me a valuable life lesson. Regardless of color, most humans are shit - outside my circle of family and friends, there are very few people I trust or even deal with.

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #42 posted 06/28/20 9:45am

poppys

This is kind of a different story so I hope it belongs here. When I was still pretty little, probably @ 1960, not really reading yet, my mom took me to the local zoo (archive photo below). At one point I raced up to a drinking fountain. Mom said I shouldn't drink there and I said why, I'm so thirsty. She looked around and said go ahead. I didn't figure out until years later, as an adult, that it was the non-white fountain.

My mom was a schoolteacher in a majority black school, she loved all her kids and really worked hard with African American students to bring them along as artists. Some of the more gifted students, black and white, got special privileges to be in the art room as assistants.

history.jpg

[Edited 6/28/20 9:47am]

"if you can't clap on the one, then don't clap at all"
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #43 posted 06/28/20 10:51am

jjhunsecker

avatar

poppys said:

This is kind of a different story so I hope it belongs here. When I was still pretty little, probably @ 1960, not really reading yet, my mom took me to the local zoo (archive photo below). At one point I raced up to a drinking fountain. Mom said I shouldn't drink there and I said why, I'm so thirsty. She looked around and said go ahead. I didn't figure out until years later, as an adult, that it was the non-white fountain.

My mom was a schoolteacher in a majority black school, she loved all her kids and really worked hard with African American students to bring them along as artists. Some of the more gifted students, black and white, got special privileges to be in the art room as assistants.

history.jpg

[Edited 6/28/20 9:47am]



That’s beautiful
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #44 posted 06/28/20 1:08pm

cborgman

avatar

uPtoWnNY said:

There was a silver lining to all the bs I dealt with in my younger years (from racists and ignorant blacks who called me white for getting good grades in school )....it toughened me up, enabled me to survive NYC. and taught me a valuable life lesson. Regardless of color, most humans are shit - outside my circle of family and friends, there are very few people I trust or even deal with.

there certainly are a lot of awful people, yea.

i actually try to find the good in people, and give them the benefit of the doubt, but...

once theyve given you nothing but pain with no reward, its time to see them for the monster hiding in human form they are. the world is rife with abusers who find ways to abuse. and you have to be able to ward them off.

Power tends to corrupt; absolute power corrupts absolutely. - Lord Acton
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #45 posted 06/28/20 1:09pm

cborgman

avatar

poppys said:

This is kind of a different story so I hope it belongs here. When I was still pretty little, probably @ 1960, not really reading yet, my mom took me to the local zoo (archive photo below). At one point I raced up to a drinking fountain. Mom said I shouldn't drink there and I said why, I'm so thirsty. She looked around and said go ahead. I didn't figure out until years later, as an adult, that it was the non-white fountain.

My mom was a schoolteacher in a majority black school, she loved all her kids and really worked hard with African American students to bring them along as artists. Some of the more gifted students, black and white, got special privileges to be in the art room as assistants.

history.jpg

[Edited 6/28/20 9:47am]

wow... thank you for sharing that.

is one of the women in the pic your mom?

Power tends to corrupt; absolute power corrupts absolutely. - Lord Acton
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #46 posted 06/28/20 1:11pm

cborgman

avatar

cborgman said:

this is secretly THE best thread in p&r

still true

Power tends to corrupt; absolute power corrupts absolutely. - Lord Acton
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #47 posted 06/28/20 1:35pm

poppys

cborgman said:

poppys said:

This is kind of a different story so I hope it belongs here. When I was still pretty little, probably @ 1960, not really reading yet, my mom took me to the local zoo (archive photo below). At one point I raced up to a drinking fountain. Mom said I shouldn't drink there and I said why, I'm so thirsty. She looked around and said go ahead. I didn't figure out until years later, as an adult, that it was the non-white fountain.

My mom was a schoolteacher in a majority black school, she loved all her kids and really worked hard with African American students to bring them along as artists. Some of the more gifted students, black and white, got special privileges to be in the art room as assistants.


wow... thank you for sharing that.

is one of the women in the pic your mom?

It's an archive photo I found when searching old images of Perkins Woods Zoo in Akron, Ohio. So uncanny, it helped me share the story. None of the people are known to me, and yet, the 2 girls look like me and my cousin right down to the clothing. I'm on the left and Nan is on the right. The lady behind us resembles my aunt Ellen, her mother. I remember the pen the penguins were in from the photo.

It would be normal to be in that group for whatever reason at the time. The zoo/park was in a predominately African American neighborhood, so it was always a mixed crowd and lots of schoolchildren trips there.

So, as with 2elijah, this thread sparked a memory.

[Edited 6/28/20 15:18pm]

"if you can't clap on the one, then don't clap at all"
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #48 posted 06/28/20 1:44pm

cborgman

avatar

poppys said:

cborgman said:


wow... thank you for sharing that.

is one of the women in the pic your mom?

It's an archive photo I found when searching old images of Perkins Woods Zoo in Akron, Ohio. So uncanny, it helped me share the story. None of the people are known to me, and yet, the 2 girls look like me and my cousin right down to the clothing. I'm on the left and Nan is on the right. The lady behind us resembles my aunt Ellen, her mother. I remember the pen the penguins were in from the photo.

It would be normal to be in that group for whatever reason at the time. The zoo/park was in a predominately African American neighborhood, so it was always a mixed crowd and lots of schoolchildren trips there.

So, as with 2elijah, this thread sparked a memory.

was perkins woods the zoo of your childhood?

i was hoping it was a person pic, so i could see your mom. but it is an adorable pic.

thank you for sharing the story, it was quite touching

.

[Edited 6/28/20 13:46pm]

Power tends to corrupt; absolute power corrupts absolutely. - Lord Acton
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #49 posted 06/28/20 2:02pm

poppys

cborgman said:

poppys said:

It's an archive photo I found when searching old images of Perkins Woods Zoo in Akron, Ohio. So uncanny, it helped me share the story. None of the people are known to me, and yet, the 2 girls look like me and my cousin right down to the clothing. I'm on the left and Nan is on the right. The lady behind us resembles my aunt Ellen, her mother. I remember the pen the penguins were in from the photo.

It would be normal to be in that group for whatever reason at the time. The zoo/park was in a predominately African American neighborhood, so it was always a mixed crowd and lots of schoolchildren trips there.

So, as with 2elijah, this thread sparked a memory.


was perkins woods the zoo of your childhood?


i was hoping it was a person pic, so i could see your mom. but it is an adorable pic.

thank you for sharing the story, it was quite touching

Yes it was, now called Perkins Park, still a zoo. Was originally searching for a photo of the water fountain, because I have an image of it in my mind. But the photo posted is the same zoo and era of my childhood. Never liked it much, I consider zoos animal prisons, even as a child. Love animals, just not my happy place for them.

But I went with my mother to school a lot and loved that. Her art room was fun and I loved her students. They were older, and accomplished in art, so I looked up to them. At least one of them that I know of became a top designer for Ellen Tracy in NYC. She kept in touch with my mom as a mentor for years.

[Edited 6/29/20 5:04am]

"if you can't clap on the one, then don't clap at all"
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #50 posted 06/28/20 2:34pm

2elijah

avatar

poppys said:

This is kind of a different story so I hope it belongs here. When I was still pretty little, probably @ 1960, not really reading yet, my mom took me to the local zoo (archive photo below). At one point I raced up to a drinking fountain. Mom said I shouldn't drink there and I said why, I'm so thirsty. She looked around and said go ahead. I didn't figure out until years later, as an adult, that it was the non-white fountain.

My mom was a schoolteacher in a majority black school, she loved all her kids and really worked hard with African American students to bring them along as artists. Some of the more gifted students, black and white, got special privileges to be in the art room as assistants.

history.jpg

[Edited 6/28/20 9:47am]


Very nice. smile Thanks for sharing Poppy.
Always smile in the face of adversity. smile
#NOFEAR
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #51 posted 06/28/20 2:36pm

cborgman

avatar

poppys said:

Was originally searching for a photo of the water fountain, because I have an image of it in my mind.

wow, that actually just really visualized it for me. i remember those style of fountains. a lot of them were replaced during my chilhood, but i remember those 40/50s/60s style ones. they always kind of looked like bird baths on pedastals.


.

[Edited 6/28/20 14:46pm]

Power tends to corrupt; absolute power corrupts absolutely. - Lord Acton
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #52 posted 06/28/20 2:46pm

poppys

DiminutiveRocker said:

cborgman said:

not just from parents, not just locally.

its become very obvious to me how systematically its built in and learned at that level. in tv, in ads, in movies, in schools... its taught on every level.


nod I tested as gifted kid when I was very young, 3rd grade or so. We lived in a 95% white suburb of LA - my parents bought our home brand new. I could count on one hand all the Mexican, Asian and Black kids in my classes. When I got to Jr High I was placed in an English class that was almost remedial - we had no books, just brought pencils to class and in it had that handful of Mexican and black kids.

My gifted class was my social studiies class and my teacher, who had this bright red hair and a strong NY accent, asked to see each of our class schedules. When she saw my English class she marched into the principal's office and showed him my test scores and immediately demanded that I be moved into her higher level English class. She called my parents to tell them what she was doing and apologized for my being misplaced. The first thing out of my older brother's mouth was "they put her in that class because she is Mexican, even though she is identified as gifted and her scores were high"

That was my first experience with the "system." I was very fortunate, and that teacher holds a special place in my memory - - but imagine all those other kids who tested fairly well but because of their names or how they looked were treated like lesser than students and placed in classes that did not challenge them or increase their learning abilities. People just defaulted to the school "authorities" to know better. Fucked up.


Your story really struck me in the heart Dimi, it stuck with me. SO infuriating, and yet typical, as other have noted. Thank goodness for the angel teacher, and your own brother being outraged and giving you validation. XO baby heart


[Edited 6/28/20 15:16pm]

"if you can't clap on the one, then don't clap at all"
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #53 posted 06/29/20 4:57am

PennyPurple

avatar

DiminutiveRocker said:

2elijah said:

jjhunsecker said: Definitely. nod [Edited 6/27/20 12:42pm]


The shift in culture has to happen. Is happening.



Anyone seeing what's happening in Branson, MO?

Protesters have been gathering outside a strip mall store Dixie Outfitters, which specializes in Confederate flags, clothing and other merchandise. The protests have drawn people from opposing sides of the debate — Black Lives Matter demonstrators, as well as those who support the store and the Confederate flag.



https://www.kansascity.com/entertainment/article243763112.html


Of course counter protesters showed up with the confed flags....and guns. neutral

Branson makes a lot of money on the hillbilly persona. Those flags are in a lot of gift shops down there. They even have photo shops that you can dress up as North or South soldiers

Dolly Parton even has a dinner show called the Dixie Stampede and the show splits sides up as the North and the South. I think last year they changed the North and the South, but I don't remember exactly what they changed it to.
-----------------------------



The stories that you have all shared hurts my heart, I'm so sorry for everything that each of you have been through.



A MASK ISN'T TOO MUCH TO ASK!!
JJPOPPYSBOMBSQUAD #OPINIONSMATTER
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #54 posted 06/29/20 6:29am

2elijah

avatar

PennyPurple said:



DiminutiveRocker said:




2elijah said:


jjhunsecker said: Definitely. nod [Edited 6/27/20 12:42pm]


The shift in culture has to happen. Is happening.



Anyone seeing what's happening in Branson, MO?

Protesters have been gathering outside a strip mall store Dixie Outfitters, which specializes in Confederate flags, clothing and other merchandise. The protests have drawn people from opposing sides of the debate — Black Lives Matter demonstrators, as well as those who support the store and the Confederate flag.




https://www.kansascity.com/entertainment/article243763112.html


Of course counter protesters showed up with the confed flags....and guns. neutral

Branson makes a lot of money on the hillbilly persona. Those flags are in a lot of gift shops down there. They even have photo shops that you can dress up as North or South soldiers


Dolly Parton even has a dinner show called the Dixie Stampede and the show splits sides up as the North and the South. I think last year they changed the North and the South, but I don't remember exactly what they changed it to.
-----




The stories that you have all shared hurts my heart, I'm so sorry for everything that each of you have been through.





Thanks Penny. If these experience aren’t shared, no one would know these things are happening. That’s why I applaud the recent protests worldwide. Of course there were and are some infiltrators in some of the protests, who had/have negative intentions, and fear the power behind what these protests can bring to forcing change in America, but by far it’s the peaceful protesters who are the force that are leading to the positive changes, which are starting to happen. Small steps towards progress, but at least we are seeing efforts made, to help eradicate some of the racism that has infected this country.

Despite the continued fight against racial/social injustices/police brutality, etc., I do believe that the good will always outweigh the bad. Thanks again.
Always smile in the face of adversity. smile
#NOFEAR
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #55 posted 06/29/20 6:34am

DiminutiveRock
er

avatar

2elijah said:

PennyPurple said:

Branson makes a lot of money on the hillbilly persona. Those flags are in a lot of gift shops down there. They even have photo shops that you can dress up as North or South soldiers

Dolly Parton even has a dinner show called the Dixie Stampede and the show splits sides up as the North and the South. I think last year they changed the North and the South, but I don't remember exactly what they changed it to.
-----------------------------



The stories that you have all shared hurts my heart, I'm so sorry for everything that each of you have been through.



Thanks Penny. If these experience aren’t shared, no one would know these things are happening. That’s why I applaud the recent protests worldwide. Of course there were and are some infiltrators in some of the protests, who had/have negative intentions, and fear the power behind what these protests can bring to forcing change in America, but by far it’s the peaceful protesters who are the force that are leading to the positive changes, which are starting to happen. Small steps towards progress, but at least we are seeing efforts made, to help eradicate some of the racism that has infected this country.

Despite the continued fight against racial/social injustices/police brutality, etc., I do believe that the good will always outweigh the bad. Thanks again.

Agreed, and thanks to both of you! grouphug

"if your voice held no power, they wouldn't try to silence you."
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #56 posted 06/29/20 3:44pm

poppys

Another NY story that happened to me in 1989, so this was about 13 years after JJ's video. My boyfriend (BF) & I went to Two Boots restaurant in the East Village with a bunch of people, at least 10. Nice big round table because everyone was local music/performers/hipsters who knew the owner. This was when they had a joint @ 2nd St, not just the pizza place they still have now.

Anyway, there was a guy at our table, a guest of one of my BF's Best Friends, and still a respected musican who Rodeo knows - but I digress. This guest guy was a yahoo from Cowboyhatville, USA. Tall, lanky, drunk & loud, I think he was a musican/trucker, Diesel something? I've blocked it out.

So, in walks The Fine Young Cannibals and entourage. Stellar moment as they were at the top with "She Drives Me Crazy". Roland Gift was tall and beautiful. In case anyone who is reading this doesn't know, it was a British band. Suddenly, yahoo Cowboyhat pipes up with "My Daddy used to own his Daddy", audible to the entire hushed dining room.

Told my BF we are leaving, or I am leaving w/out you. Paid for our drinks and left. I did get a hazy group general girlfriend demerit for not staying silent and keeping my place. But as most of you probably know already, I did not give a rat's ass.

fine-young-cannibals.png?w=450

[Edited 6/29/20 16:04pm]

"if you can't clap on the one, then don't clap at all"
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #57 posted 06/29/20 4:45pm

2elijah

avatar

poppys said:

Another NY story that happened to me in 1989, so this was about 13 years after JJ's video. My boyfriend (BF) & I went to Two Boots restaurant in the East Village with a bunch of people, at least 10. Nice big round table because everyone was local music/performers/hipsters who knew the owner. This was when they had a joint @ 2nd St, not just the pizza place they still have now.

Anyway, there was a guy at our table, a guest of one of my BF's Best Friends, and still a respected musican who Rodeo knows - but I digress. This guest guy was a yahoo from Cowboyhatville, USA. Tall, lanky, drunk & loud, I think he was a musican/trucker, Diesel something? I've blocked it out.

So, in walks The Fine Young Cannibals and entourage. Stellar moment as they were at the top with "She Drives Me Crazy". Roland Gift was tall and beautiful. In case anyone who is reading this doesn't know, it was a British band. Suddenly, yahoo Cowboyhat pipes up with "My Daddy used to own his Daddy", audible to the entire hushed dining room.

Told my BF we are leaving, or I am leaving w/out you. Paid for our drinks and left. I did get a hazy group general girlfriend demerit for not staying silent and keeping my place. But as most of you probably know already, I did not give a rat's ass.

fine-young-cannibals.png?w=450

[Edited 6/29/20 16:04pm]


An uncomfortable moment.
Always smile in the face of adversity. smile
#NOFEAR
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #58 posted 06/29/20 5:09pm

poppys

2elijah said:

poppys said:

Another NY story that happened to me in 1989, so this was about 13 years after JJ's video. My boyfriend (BF) & I went to Two Boots restaurant in the East Village with a bunch of people, at least 10. Nice big round table because everyone was local music/performers/hipsters who knew the owner. This was when they had a joint @ 2nd St, not just the pizza place they still have now.

Anyway, there was a guy at our table, a guest of one of my BF's Best Friends, and still a respected musican who Rodeo knows - but I digress. This guest guy was a yahoo from Cowboyhatville, USA. Tall, lanky, drunk & loud, I think he was a musican/trucker, Diesel something? I've blocked it out.

So, in walks The Fine Young Cannibals and entourage. Stellar moment as they were at the top with "She Drives Me Crazy". Roland Gift was tall and beautiful. In case anyone who is reading this doesn't know, it was a British band. Suddenly, yahoo Cowboyhat pipes up with "My Daddy used to own his Daddy", audible to the entire hushed dining room.

Told my BF we are leaving, or I am leaving w/out you. Paid for our drinks and left. I did get a hazy group general girlfriend demerit for not staying silent and keeping my place. But as most of you probably know already, I did not give a rat's ass.

fine-young-cannibals.png?w=450


An uncomfortable moment.

Yes, and a moment that sealed my trajectory with that very influential group of people. White people in general really don't have a "community". They just have rules. Not sorry.

"if you can't clap on the one, then don't clap at all"
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #59 posted 06/30/20 4:59pm

jjhunsecker

avatar

poppys said:

Another NY story that happened to me in 1989, so this was about 13 years after JJ's video. My boyfriend (BF) & I went to Two Boots restaurant in the East Village with a bunch of people, at least 10. Nice big round table because everyone was local music/performers/hipsters who knew the owner. This was when they had a joint @ 2nd St, not just the pizza place they still have now.

Anyway, there was a guy at our table, a guest of one of my BF's Best Friends, and still a respected musican who Rodeo knows - but I digress. This guest guy was a yahoo from Cowboyhatville, USA. Tall, lanky, drunk & loud, I think he was a musican/trucker, Diesel something? I've blocked it out.

So, in walks The Fine Young Cannibals and entourage. Stellar moment as they were at the top with "She Drives Me Crazy". Roland Gift was tall and beautiful. In case anyone who is reading this doesn't know, it was a British band. Suddenly, yahoo Cowboyhat pipes up with "My Daddy used to own his Daddy", audible to the entire hushed dining room.

Told my BF we are leaving, or I am leaving w/out you. Paid for our drinks and left. I did get a hazy group general girlfriend demerit for not staying silent and keeping my place. But as most of you probably know already, I did not give a rat's ass.

fine-young-cannibals.png?w=450

[Edited 6/29/20 16:04pm]



God, that’s so ignorant
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Page 2 of 2 <12
Reply   New topic   Printable     (Log in to 'subscribe' to this topic)
« Previous topic  Next topic »
Forums > Politics & Religion > The world I was raised in...