independent and unofficial
Prince fan community
Forum jump
Forums > Politics & Religion > Good Cop Stories
« Previous topic  Next topic »
Reply   New topic   Printable     (Log in to 'subscribe' to this topic)
Author

Tweet     Share

Message
Thread started 06/25/20 9:42am

3rdeyedude

avatar

Good Cop Stories

** MODERATORS NOTE **
Please don't post with the hopes of a fight.
Sometimes if you don't have anything good to add/say,

then don't add/say anything at all

.
You probably won't find this letter. or any good news about police these days. But I liked this letter from a Baltimore County cop. Turn off your television for a while and put down your cell phone. Take a break from P&R for a while. The world is not as evil as you seem to think it is. And you know who I am talking about in this forum.

An open letter to a protestor:

We might sit down over coffee, and I would start by telling you that I have done a lot of good things in my short five-year career. I was the first officer on-scene for a call at a college campus which stated that a delusional person was wandering the halls of a dormitory with a gun. In that incident, we found the person responsible just as he was about to commit a sexual assault. A few months ago, I went to a call for shots fired, ran after an armed person in the dark, and caught him with the help of my partners. A few weeks ago, I was part of a group of officers that caught an “armed and dangerous” murderer after a high-speed pursuit. In all of these incidents, no one was hurt. And none of them were on the news. My interest is not to criticize the media, but simply to point out that for every negative news story involving the police, there are thousands of positive stories which proceed normally, without incident, and without recognition.

I would tell you my stories of doing good deeds. I have saved one life directly, and many others indirectly. I have given out many, many warnings when I could have given out citations. I have let people go home when I could have taken them to jail. Every year, I spend hundreds of dollars of my own money buying food for the hungry, transportation for the stranded, and shelter for the homeless. I might tell you about the time I paid the towing fee to get a DUI suspect’s car out of the tow yard after discovering that his impairment was mostly due to an undiagnosed brain injury. There have been a handful of times where I nearly shot someone, but didn’t, and mere milliseconds made the difference. I have never been accused of excessive force or brutality, and I make an effort to stay composed, even when people spit in my face, or worse. More recently, even after someone coughed on me repeatedly while telling me that he wanted me to die from coronavirus, I stayed composed.

I would explain to you that not losing my temper is one small part of my job, as is the ideal of being superhuman. For any personality trait, I’m expected to know the exact range between two extremes, and I’m expected know exactly how much of it to apply, and exactly when. I would offer to take you on a ride-along, and show you that my job is incredibly difficult. I have to record every single thing I do on camera, thereby subjecting myself to criticism from anyone and everyone, including myself. I have to be everywhere, all the time, and I have to be everything to everyone, immediately, and perfectly.

I would tell you these things not to garner sympathy, but to provide you with insight into that which you might not see. I would do this to illustrate that most police officers are good people like me. I would explain how part of me cringes at the comment that I’m “one of the good ones,” as if I’m the exception to the rule. Because the truth is, I represent the norm. I would be tempted to point out statistical realities to support this point, but numbers never seem to hold any gravity when compared to the raw footage of a bad cop making a bad decision. And the sad fact of the matter is, I am one person, and my range of control doesn’t extend very far beyond my own decisions. But I do what I can, and I try to lead by example. Still, I can’t possibly account for the actions of the eight hundred thousand police officers in this country. Most, like me, strive for good. Some, being merely human, make mistakes. Others, demonstrably sociopathic, commit ugly, abhorrent crimes for which they should be imprisoned.

I would point out that all institutions evolve over time, whether it’s religion, government, or law enforcement. While institutional change in the criminal justice system is needed, I would suggest that one does not need to demonize “THE” police as a whole to achieve that end. Cops are not all the same. I would ask that you judge me not by my uniform, but by the content of my character. I would point out that “us versus them” thinking is always bad, no matter which side you’re on.

My patrol shift is remarkably diverse, and I am bi-racial. These demographic trends towards diversity in my department coincide with an overall shift in police culture, directed towards de-escalation and service to the community. I acknowledge that while my department may be ahead of the curve, my narrow experience isn’t necessarily indicative of the status quo. You and I would agree that law enforcement can be improved, and we could ponder about how things might look if there were no budgetary constraints at all. If only we could attain the selectivity and educational rigor of an Ivy League school, the years-long training of a doctor, the insight of a cultural anthropologist, and the broadened mindset of a philosopher. With a sigh, I would lament with you that progress itself never comes as quickly or as completely as it should.

I would describe how disheartening and strange it is to be hated by the very people for whom I risk life and limb to protect. I could tell you about my permanent back injury, and all of the other times I’ve been assaulted and injured. I might tell you what it’s like to attend a police funeral. To fight and die for a populace who ignores you, or worse yet, hates you, engenders a lot of doubt, but it also speaks to a remarkable quality of character. This is what weighs on me most heavily, and it is an added layer of confusion that rests on top of the daily barrage of human-to-human ugliness to which I must bear witness.

I sometimes wonder what my life would have been like if I had chosen a different career, and why I continue to sacrifice my physical health, my mental health, and my personal life, for strangers. But then the prominent engravings of ethical considerations of right and wrong, tediously ground in me since birth and deepened over time, become present on my mind. Civilized society can’t exist without rules, and the people to enforce those rules. Someone has to take the point, and go out in front. Someone has to do it. And so if it must be done, it should be done right. Doing the job right demands a set of people with a deeply-set inscription of ideals, like integrity and personal sacrifice. It is evident to me that one of the ingredients that causes the arc of history to bend towards justice is sacrifice. I choose to suffer for the benefit of the whole because that is the task that best suits my disposition. I break my back by pulling the weeds and hauling the water and tilling the garden of our society, all so that plants may grow.

I would implore you to see that we are both disgusted by bad cops. I would suggest that because we both believe in and demand things like equality and justice, you and I are not so different, and I am not your enemy. And because we both want the same things, there does not have to be so much darkness between us. We both want to see positive change for humanity, and so we look towards the light at the end of the tunnel.

I would describe the pit in my chest when I watch George Floyd’s last moments, not only because of the horror and the inhumanity, but because of what it means for my profession. I envision a pool of water in a cupped hand; a tiny, delicately built reservoir of trust and confidence, fragile and tenuous, slipping through the fingers, vanishing away like a dream. I see the subsequent reaction as the hand is rolled up into a balled fist whereby thousands upon thousands of upstanding, honest police officers like me will have to contend with death threats, bottles and bricks thrown in our faces, and gunfire. I see the omen of a white glove, knocking on my parents’ door in the middle of the night, the harbinger of news too terrible to bear.

And so you and I would talk, and I would commiserate with you, listen to your grievances, and be open to suggestions about how to move forward in a productive way. I would ask that we not allow anger to spiral down into outright chaos and insanity. I would ask that we avoid hurting each other, and that I want both of us to be able to go home safely. And I would tell you that I will protect your safety and your rights with everything that I have, and all that I can muster.

At the end of the conversation, I would hope that you see me for who I am, not what I am. I would be tempted to bring things to a close by trying to say something magnanimous without sounding silly or robotic, perhaps by mentioning the oath that I swore to uphold. And so instead of repeating platitudes, I would simply remind you that even if you still hate me, if you ever dial 911 or call out for help, I will come running. I promise. I will come running.

And then I would open my palm, and offer you my outstretched hand.

Sincerely,
Officer Templeton

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #1 posted 07/01/20 3:49am

3rdeyedude

avatar

Kinda proved my point that nobody is interested in positive news, especially about a police officer. Sad state of affairs in the USA.

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #2 posted 07/01/20 6:38am

Empress

3rdeyedude said:

Kinda proved my point that nobody is interested in positive news, especially about a police officer. Sad state of affairs in the USA.


Your country is in a huge mess all the way around. We all must know that there are good and bad in all and that includes cops. I have a cop in my family so I understand some of the challenges they have each and every day. I do believe there are many good cops of all races, but many need better training.
[Edited 7/1/20 6:39am]
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #3 posted 07/01/20 8:04am

jjhunsecker

avatar

I have had police officers as family and friends, and I applaud those who do a good job.
But there are too many (even if there’s just a small amount) who do a bad job, and mess things up for the rest of them, and for us honest citizens. And the good cops do very little to stop the bad ones.

Interesting aside: NYC Police Commissioner Bill Brattain once said he never met a Black police officer who hadn’t been racially harassed when off duty out of uniform
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #4 posted 07/01/20 9:55am

DiminutiveRock
er

avatar

The problem is the current system. The system allows for bad cops to brutalize and kill without consequence and the victims of said brutality are disproportionately people of color.

We all know here are good and bad cops - that is not the issue.


The issue is the system, not the individual cop.


















[Edited 7/1/20 10:07am]

"if your voice held no power, they wouldn't try to silence you."
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #5 posted 07/05/20 10:35am

3rdeyedude

avatar

DiminutiveRocker said:

The problem is the current system. The system allows for bad cops to brutalize and kill without consequence and the victims of said brutality are disproportionately people of color.

We all know here are good and bad cops - that is not the issue.


The issue is the system, not the individual cop.


















[Edited 7/1/20 10:07am]

I agree that the system is not adequate. But let's face it, inner cities must be included in that system and work needs to be done in all aspects of making the system better. If there were no crime in these places, cops would not need to be there. I live in a very safe neighborhood and almost never see police cars. I think these cities are desperate to hire cops, because nobody wants to work where you might get shot by accident just trying to go to work. So they hire who shows up and don't train them properly and let some bad apples spoil the bunch. Still not seeing where racism comes into play. (wasn't hoping to start a fight by the way mods eek )

[Edited 7/5/20 10:36am]

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #6 posted 07/05/20 5:26pm

jjhunsecker

avatar

3rdeyedude said:



DiminutiveRocker said:


The problem is the current system. The system allows for bad cops to brutalize and kill without consequence and the victims of said brutality are disproportionately people of color.

We all know here are good and bad cops - that is not the issue.


The issue is the system, not the individual cop.



















[Edited 7/1/20 10:07am]




I agree that the system is not adequate. But let's face it, inner cities must be included in that system and work needs to be done in all aspects of making the system better. If there were no crime in these places, cops would not need to be there. I live in a very safe neighborhood and almost never see police cars. I think these cities are desperate to hire cops, because nobody wants to work where you might get shot by accident just trying to go to work. So they hire who shows up and don't train them properly and let some bad apples spoil the bunch. Still not seeing where racism comes into play. (wasn't hoping to start a fight by the way mods eek )

[Edited 7/5/20 10:36am]



There are numerous studies that show that whites and non-Whites are arrested in different proportions for the same or similar offenses. “Stop and Frisk” searches have been proven to be disproportionately perpetrated against minorities. Do your homework. You can’t extrapolate from your experience as a White person in America and say “Why isn’t it the same in Black and Latino communities “ without knowing the complete history and background. (And as a person who has admitted to profiling Black people as part of your job in the past, you should certainly understand what could possibly happen if someone in your position had a badge and a gun and the weight of social norms on your side)
[Edited 7/5/20 17:28pm]
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #7 posted 07/07/20 4:59am

3rdeyedude

avatar

jjhunsecker said:

3rdeyedude said:

I agree that the system is not adequate. But let's face it, inner cities must be included in that system and work needs to be done in all aspects of making the system better. If there were no crime in these places, cops would not need to be there. I live in a very safe neighborhood and almost never see police cars. I think these cities are desperate to hire cops, because nobody wants to work where you might get shot by accident just trying to go to work. So they hire who shows up and don't train them properly and let some bad apples spoil the bunch. Still not seeing where racism comes into play. (wasn't hoping to start a fight by the way mods eek )

[Edited 7/5/20 10:36am]

There are numerous studies that show that whites and non-Whites are arrested in different proportions for the same or similar offenses. “Stop and Frisk” searches have been proven to be disproportionately perpetrated against minorities. Do your homework. You can’t extrapolate from your experience as a White person in America and say “Why isn’t it the same in Black and Latino communities “ without knowing the complete history and background. (And as a person who has admitted to profiling Black people as part of your job in the past, you should certainly understand what could possibly happen if someone in your position had a badge and a gun and the weight of social norms on your side) [Edited 7/5/20 17:28pm]

Oh, I have done my homework. And I'm all for fixing the police system. Never said I wasn't. I grew up with cops that would beat-up shoplifters (both white and black) just for fun. I guess it saved them from having to do paperwork. But most cops I know are good.

Anyway, I am proud of all my brothers and sisters that participated in peaceful BLM protests across the U.S. and the World. I'm hopeful that a new generation of white kids will be more woke than my generation. As a white dude I have met more racists than you will ever meet in your life. Most of them are just ignorant and were never given a real education in public schools. Then they grow up and realize that they never really have to go back and learn about the Black American experience. I mean look at Trump. Do you think he has ever had to learn about it and or/wants to? Well, just add millions of white Americans to that list.

And these days you can start adding Latino culture to that list too because many of them are not getting educated well either. I'm sure that adds to the tension in poor communities where Latino and Black Americans are forced to live near each other. I feel as though Americans are just too busy trying to make a dollar to focus on learning about each other. Nobody is out for the good of the entire group. It's everyone for themself. Me first/everyone else last. In some ways, Trump is Amerca personified.

[Edited 7/7/20 5:01am]

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #8 posted 07/07/20 7:52am

jjhunsecker

avatar

I would change your last sentence to read “Trump is a SEGMENT of America personified “. But otherwise I pretty much agree

The funny thing is that Trump was born and raised less than 5 miles from where I was, and about 2 miles from where I live now. So it’s hysterical hearing him talk about “our heritage “ when he discusses the Civil War monuments and flags... his family wasn’t even in this country at the time
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #9 posted 07/07/20 9:24am

OldFriends4Sal
e

avatar

moderator

COVID19 idleness, Gang violence, Bail Reform...

Shootings spike: 50 shot since Friday in New York City, 11 dead

.

NEW YORK CITY (WABC) -- There has been a major spike in gun violence in New York City.

Since Friday, police say at least 11 people were killed in roughly 50 shootings across all five boroughs.

.

RELATED: 7 On Your Side Investigates reasons behind uptick in NYC gun violence

A shooting outside a NYCHA complex Friday in Brooklyn has police searching for the man who opened fire moments after a child walked inside the apartment building.

.

In Queens, local leaders are sounding off after there was a 14-year-old boy shot in Saint Albans on Monday.

Investigators believe it might be the result of gang violence.

The shooting happened around 5 p.m. Monday.

The teen was shot multiple times in the abdomen and neck.

Police are still looking for two suspects who fled the scene.

In another highly disturbing shooting, Anthony Robinson, 29, was walking with his daughter on East 170th Street in the Bronx just before 6 p.m. when a car pulled up and a gunman opened fire out the window.

The video shows the girl running for cover as Robinson falls to the ground.

.

Authorities say Robinson, who reportedly has many prior arrests, was pronounced dead at BronxCare Health System. The child was not physically harmed.

This comes on top of an extremely bloody holiday weekend, where 11 people were killed and dozens of others were injured.

NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea is blaming jail reforms and the release of prisoners from Rikers due to coronavirus.

The NYPD met with the five district attorneys Monday as they tried to tackle the problem.

"We have a lot, a lot of crew and gang violence. People don't know how to settle disputes. They only know how to settle it with guns," said Darcel D. Clark, Bronx District Attorney.

"The mayor released those on Rikers Island, but he went overboard and released too many," said MIchael McMahon, Staten Island District Attorney.

The numbers tell the story. The count on shootings is more than double this June compared to last year. There have been 205 shootings this June. That number was 89 last June.

The NYPD and prosecutors are calling on the community to help as they search for the many gun violence suspects.

.

"There is a lot of gang activity, a lot of drug activity," Police Commissioner Dermot Shea told NY1 Monday morning. "It's bad people with guns, and it doesn't get any simpler than that. People settling scores, spraying a crowd."

.

Calling the amount of violence in the city this weekend unacceptable, NYPD Chief of Department Terence Monahan said they are working to get guns off the street but added that rhetoric from a small majority of people is hurting police. He says that when officers go to make arrests, people are ready to fight them.
He also said a new law banning chokeholds is worded so poorly that officers are afraid of making arrests.

"They are afraid if they're making an arrest, that if their knee goes on the back of someone that they're fighting their life, for that they can be prosecuted," he said. "That's a problem."

The city's main jail complex emptied due to coronavirus, and Shea said that population was "transplanted" to the streets.

"Look at the Rikers population of the last year, it's about half," he said. "Where is that other half right now? We've transplanted the general population to the streets of New York City, and it's extremely frustrating."

"We have to get the criminal justice system moving," Shea said.

While the NYPD has made approximately 40,000 fewer overall arrests so far this year compared with last year, gun arrests year-to-date as of July 5 are 1,679 vs. 1,683 last year.

"The sharp increase in shootings and violence in New York puts innocent people at risk and tears at the fabric of life in our city," Shea said. "The challenges are great for an NYPD facing the strain of deep budget cuts, changes to the criminal justice system that are impacting the courts and the continuing international health pandemic. But through it all, I have seen our hardworking men and women display an unwavering commitment to the kind of fair and effective policing that defines our agency and that New Yorkers expect and deserve."

The number of burglaries increased 118% (1,783 vs. 817), and the number of auto thefts increased 51% (696 vs. 462).

Police brass pointed to a round of deep budget cuts that have led to a class of 1,163 recruits being canceled and an increase in retirements, as well the NYPD's facilitation of peaceful protests that they say continues to utilize department resources.

They also say criminals released due to bail reform have been rearrested for approximately 750 additional major felonies through June 26, compared with the population of those released in the same period a year ago.

https://abc7ny.com/shooti...5Y-CBlVJ-g

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER


What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your milli
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #10 posted 07/07/20 9:35am

13cjk13

avatar

SNIP - Of4$

"hey if you found out someone gave you a fake $20 would you be mad?"It is in fact #TRUTH
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #11 posted 07/07/20 10:29am

OldFriends4Sal
e

avatar

moderator

3rdeyedude said:

Kinda proved my point that nobody is interested in positive news, especially about a police officer. Sad state of affairs in the USA.

Catch & Release Bail Reform laws have some good sides like someone driving without car registration, should not have to spend time in jail. But there are too many other crimes that are actually violent where people are being allowed back on the street. New York State just went this way of bail reform earlier this year. Chicago police have been talking about this being a problem in Chicago's SE side and why it doesn't work. NYS better listen to the NYPD and state police departments.

5aba62f807471e6589ccb4047354449c.jpg

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER


What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your milli
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #12 posted 07/07/20 8:46pm

OldFriends4Sal
e

avatar

moderator

NYC Guardian Angels founder says police have been 'neutered,’ and inner cities have become ‘war zones’

More than 44 people were shot in NYC over the Fourth of July weekend

Over the month of June, New York City saw a 130 percent increase in shooting incidents compared to the same time last year. Despite the increase in violent crime, New York Mayor Bill de Blasio has passed a budget slashing over $1 billion in funding from the New York Police Department and canceling the July recruit class, which includes almost 1,200 new officers.

Curtis Sliwa, founder of the New York City Guardian Angels, an unarmed civilian patrol group that was created to help combat widespread violence in NYC in the late '70s, is appalled over the direction his beloved city is headed.

“This reminds me of what it was like when I first started the Guardian Angels in 1979. Between 1979 and 1993, when thank God Rudy Giuliani was elected mayor on a law and order platform and returned stability and a quality of life to the city of New York, we had six Guardian Angels shot and killed in the line of duty. And we're starting to move back in that direction,” Sliwa told Fox News.

While some may be looking to the police to curb the rise in crime in New York City, factors like bail reform and a judicial system frozen by the coronavirus pandemic, allow suspects to be released after being arrested, often leaving the police with their hands tied.

“Imagine you're a police officer you're risking your life each and every day, you see an Uzi-toting, dope-sucking, psychopathic killing machine who's back out on the street. And you look at your partner and you say, 'What's the point of arresting them?'" Sliwa said. "The court system cut him loose and the governors are all proud of their no bail laws--and yet none of them have to deal in the streets. None of them ever have conversations with the cops.”

https://www.foxnews.com/media/nyc-guardian-angels-founder-police-neutered-inner-cities-war-zones?fbclid=IwAR1Yt3XTq6cZv34SYcrrVtZbDiaqjiT1FNE7UHe_8pF-AhaNQyopgLWlZLo

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER


What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your milli
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #13 posted 07/08/20 10:51am

OldFriends4Sal
e

avatar

moderator

https://newyork.cbslocal....Y.facebook

Recently Retired NYPD Detective Speaks Out About Her Decision To Leave The Force

July 7, 2020 at 5:56 pmFiled Under:Lisa Rozner, Local TV, nyc shootings, NYPD, Police Reforms

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) – With a spike in shootings comparable to the 1990s, an NYPD detective is sharing what she saw leading up to her retirement last week.

"Thank you for letting me be your mom," First Grade Detective Veronica Correa said at her retirement last week. She was brought to tears.

The 47-year-old started in 1994 in the 83rd precinct in Bushwick. She's from Far Rockaway.

"I grew up In such a bad neighborhood. So I wanted to make change," she told CBS2's Lisa Rozner.

As a rookie, she was writing a ticket when she says a young gang member was fatally shot by a 15-year-old.

"We're talking for maybe 20 minutes, all of a sudden, while I'm talking to him, he just died," Correa said. "So for me it was 'Wow – this is real. Wow – there is no regard for human life.'"

But Correa says through community policing, and later as an undercover, things improved. Since 1999, she mentored others at the tactical training facility on City Island.

What did she teach them?

"Executing search warrants, active shooters," she said.

The career undercover was put back in uniform last month to back up police on foot patrol, particularly in the Wakefield section of the Bronx where there was looting.

"I get right past 241st Street and I hear numerous shots. So I look at my supervisor and I go 'Those are shots. Are you kidding me, its daytime out,'" she said. "And then we're out there the next day and people were just shooting all night long. It was just all night long, shooting."

Correa was deeply affected by the breakdown in relations between cops and community. She was so worried while in uniform she did not eat on the job, Rozner reported.

"I never felt so uncomfortable being in uniform.. like I walk into a gasoline station, and a guy said to me real quietly, 'Listen, we don't all hate you,'" Correa said. "Then I walk a couple steps further and an older gentlemen told 'I wish you f******* dropped dead.'"

The single mom says she wanted to stay to help her brothers and sisters in blue, but her daughter asked her to come home..

"I was afraid of getting killed or losing my pension," she said.

The head of the Detectives Endowment Association says recently changed laws on how to restrain someone is why he believes almost half of the recent retirees are detectives.

"If you're in a violent struggle, it's very difficult to not touch from the neck to the waist during the struggle. It's a very difficult task to do," said Paul DiGiacomo of the Detectives Endowment Association.

And the expertise of detectives in units like crime scene, counterterrorism and cold case investigations can't be replaced.

Correa, who's affectionately known as "Mama Bear," says her love for the city won't stop. She just has to adjust to lending her support from the sidelines

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER


What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your milli
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #14 posted 07/09/20 6:35am

3rdeyedude

avatar

OldFriends4Sale said:

https://newyork.cbslocal....Y.facebook

Recently Retired NYPD Detective Speaks Out About Her Decision To Leave The Force

July 7, 2020 at 5:56 pmFiled Under:Lisa Rozner, Local TV, nyc shootings, NYPD, Police Reforms

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) – With a spike in shootings comparable to the 1990s, an NYPD detective is sharing what she saw leading up to her retirement last week.

"Thank you for letting me be your mom," First Grade Detective Veronica Correa said at her retirement last week. She was brought to tears.

The 47-year-old started in 1994 in the 83rd precinct in Bushwick. She's from Far Rockaway.

"I grew up In such a bad neighborhood. So I wanted to make change," she told CBS2's Lisa Rozner.

As a rookie, she was writing a ticket when she says a young gang member was fatally shot by a 15-year-old.

"We're talking for maybe 20 minutes, all of a sudden, while I'm talking to him, he just died," Correa said. "So for me it was 'Wow – this is real. Wow – there is no regard for human life.'"

But Correa says through community policing, and later as an undercover, things improved. Since 1999, she mentored others at the tactical training facility on City Island.

What did she teach them?

"Executing search warrants, active shooters," she said.

The career undercover was put back in uniform last month to back up police on foot patrol, particularly in the Wakefield section of the Bronx where there was looting.

"I get right past 241st Street and I hear numerous shots. So I look at my supervisor and I go 'Those are shots. Are you kidding me, its daytime out,'" she said. "And then we're out there the next day and people were just shooting all night long. It was just all night long, shooting."

Correa was deeply affected by the breakdown in relations between cops and community. She was so worried while in uniform she did not eat on the job, Rozner reported.

"I never felt so uncomfortable being in uniform.. like I walk into a gasoline station, and a guy said to me real quietly, 'Listen, we don't all hate you,'" Correa said. "Then I walk a couple steps further and an older gentlemen told 'I wish you f******* dropped dead.'"

The single mom says she wanted to stay to help her brothers and sisters in blue, but her daughter asked her to come home..

"I was afraid of getting killed or losing my pension," she said.

The head of the Detectives Endowment Association says recently changed laws on how to restrain someone is why he believes almost half of the recent retirees are detectives.

"If you're in a violent struggle, it's very difficult to not touch from the neck to the waist during the struggle. It's a very difficult task to do," said Paul DiGiacomo of the Detectives Endowment Association.

And the expertise of detectives in units like crime scene, counterterrorism and cold case investigations can't be replaced.

Correa, who's affectionately known as "Mama Bear," says her love for the city won't stop. She just has to adjust to lending her support from the sidelines

This is really sad. She and other cops are the real heroes in all of this. And I agree with what she said about "no regard for human life" because it's a reality that they face each day. It's going to be hard to recruit new officers now. Harder than ever. And meanwhile, inner cities are as violent as they have ever been. Recently and 8 year old was killed with an assault rifle in Atlanta and an 11 year old killed in DC. All killed by people with "no regard for human life". And it's a lot of people. Not just a few bad apples.

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #15 posted 07/17/20 12:40pm

OldFriends4Sal
e

avatar

moderator



The State Where Protests Have Already Forced Major Police Reform

Russell Berman 8 hrs ago

In Loveland, Colorado—the nation's self-proclaimed "Sweetheart City," about an hour's drive north of Denver—a young police officer paused earlier this month as he was arresting a pregnant woman who had outstanding warrants. Should he handcuff her, the officer asked his supervisors, or, under a new Colorado policing law, would that now be considered excessive force?

To officers like Rob Pride, a Loveland patrol sergeant who relayed that example to me last week, that kind of hesitation is the most worrisome part of the first-in-the-nation police-reform law that Colorado enacted on June 13. To the bill's supporters, however, the young officer's pause is precisely the goal.

Barely a month has passed since Colorado legislators raced to approve the Enhance Law Enforcement Integrity Act as protesters marched and chanted outside the state capitol in Denver. The demonstrators demanded justice for George Floyd, a 46-year-old Black man killed by police in Minneapolis, and for Elijah McClain, a 23-year-old Black man whose death at the hands of police nine months earlier in a Denver suburb attracted no national outcry at the time, but has received fresh attention this summer. Many of the new law's provisions—banning choke holds, overhauling the use of force, and significantly expanding the use of body cameras—won't formally take effect for months, or even years. But policing in Colorado is already changing.

The legislation is the first in the country that allows victims of police violence to sue officers under state law. "I'm worried for my guys," Pride, a national trustee of Colorado's Fraternal Order of Police, told me in a phone interview. They've been trained not to hesitate: "When we hesitate," he said, "there's a good chance that we don't go home at the end of the day." But, Pride suggested, if they're saddled with the fear of potentially losing their life savings, in addition to their job, how can they not?

The authors of the new law in Colorado say this reaction from officers on the street—call it an extra note of caution or restraint, if not hesitation—is healthy. What if, for example, the officers who confronted Elijah McClain in Aurora had hesitated before they placed him in a carotid hold and cut off the blood flow to his brain, or before the paramedics they called to the scene injected him with the sedative ketamine, after which he went into cardiac arrest and later died?

"If officers are rethinking [their career] because of a law of integrity and accountability, then they shouldn't be in the profession as a police officer," Colorado State Representative Leslie Herod, who wrote the new law, told me. "Their duty is to serve and protect, not kill. It is very important that law-enforcement officers think before they act."

Herod first tried to overhaul policing laws earlier this year, in response to McClain's death. She initially wrote a narrower bill to ban choke holds and limit when police could fire on fleeing suspects, but Democratic leaders told her she'd have to try again next year, once she could gather some support from law enforcement. In fact, it was only because of the coronavirus pandemic that the Colorado legislature—which had postponed work from earlier in the spring—was even in session when the George Floyd protests erupted in Denver at the end of May.

As it happened, Herod, a Democrat and a Black woman, had joined protesters outside the state capitol when a gunman fired several shots into the crowd. State patrol officers rushed her back inside to safety, she told me in a phone interview last week. On a call later with fellow Democrats, her colleagues offered support and asked how they could help. Frustrated, Herod replied: "I don't want a card. I don't want any niceties. I want a bill, and I need your support to get a bill introduced that addresses these concerns."

Democratic leaders allowed Herod to write a new police-reform bill, and, she said, gave her "carte blanche" to make it as broad as she wanted. In another big shift, the state Senate president, Leroy Garcia, agreed to work with Herod and move the proposal, which became known as Senate Bill 217, through the legislature's more closely divided upper chamber, where law-enforcement groups had blocked previous police-reform measures in the past.

Lawmakers were working under a tight time frame; the legislative session that began after Memorial Day was scheduled to last just three weeks. All the while, the protests continued outside the capitol. "Every day we would go into the capitol, and by about noon, we would start to hear chants from the crowd," Herod recalled. "Pass 217! I can't breathe. [Then] eight minutes, forty-six seconds of silence.

"That gets in people's minds," she told me.

In Colorado, police unions have fewer collective-bargaining rights and, as a result, less political clout than they do in places like New York City, where the unions have seemingly had veto power over even the most progressive mayors. Outside liberal cities like Denver and Boulder, Colorado is more rural and more red politically, with a large evangelical population and a big military presence connected to the Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs. Still, the state has trended bluer in the past decade, and Democrats now control the governor's mansion and both state legislative chambers.

Law-enforcement groups like Colorado's Fraternal Order of Police and the County Sheriffs of Colorado saw that a bill was going to pass. So instead of opposing it outright, they stayed officially neutral and pushed for changes. "Some form of this bill was going to pass," Pride told me, "and we just wanted to be a part of that discussion and be at the table, since our members are going to be the ones affected by it."

The law contained a raft of changes that reformers have long sought, but the most significant provision is one that no state has successfully passed before, and the change that cops fear most: Police officers can now be sued, they can no longer claim "qualified immunity" from civil damages if they knowingly violate the law on the job, and they could personally be on the hook for up to $25,000 in penalties stemming from a lawsuit. Colorado's removal of this protection could give momentum to similar legislative efforts across the country, such as in New York and Massachusetts, and at the federal level.

The law-enforcement groups who participated in negotiations did win some concessions. The personal-liability cap for officers was lowered from $100,000 to $25,000, making the "qualified immunity" provision a bit easier for law enforcement to swallow. Data-collection requirements aimed at eliminating racial profiling were revised, and rules governing the use of body cameras were tweaked to address privacy concerns. Reform advocates dropped demands for an independent oversight board and a ban on the sale of military-style equipment to police departments. But the core provisions of the proposal stayed in. "The bill was never watered down," Denise Maes, the public-policy director for Colorado's chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union, told me.

Pride said that just in the few weeks since the bill was signed, on June 19, several officers have already put in for early retirement. "Officers are very afraid that even if they are out here trying to do the right thing, making the best decision they can with the information they are presented at the time, that they are now open to personal liability and it's opening their families up to personal liability," he said. "We'll never agree with that piece of the bill."

In Douglas County, Sheriff Tony Spurlock, who has worked in law enforcement for nearly four decades and is a former director of the state sheriff's association, told me the worries extended to younger cops. They include his 27-year-old son, an officer in Douglas who recently confided to him that the new law had caused him to rethink a career in law enforcement. "From his perspective, it's like, Well, wait a minute: If I make a mistake, then I'm going to be held liable?" he said.

Pride and Spurlock worry about retention and recruitment—applications for jobs in law enforcement have been dropping nationwide since long before Floyd's death brought even more negative attention to policing. Yet they're also concerned about the law's subtler, but potentially more dangerous, impact. "There are some things in this bill that are going to cause hesitation," Pride said.

Despite their opposition to the loss of qualified immunity and other aspects of the bill, both Pride and Spurlock told me they thought the law would do a lot of good. Law-enforcement groups wanted the ability to more easily banish "bad cops," Pride said, and they supported efforts to require officers to intervene when they see a colleague using excessive force, as the officers who stood idly by in the Floyd killing did not do. "We are about being professional," Spurlock told me. "We are about being ethical and supporting our communities. And we're also about getting rid of people that don't want to conform to these high standards."

Politically, law-enforcement groups have to balance their role in protecting the interests of their members with a desire to improve the public's image of the police. Pride said incidents like the Floyd murder and McClain's killing have made it harder for police to do their job well. "There is a mutual interest in getting bad cops out of our profession," he told me. "We cannot effectively police our communities unless we have their trust, and incidents like that just destroy that and take us years to rebuild."

Herod's work isn't done, either. Acknowledging how fast the law came together, she said lawmakers would tweak its language next year if needed.

I asked if she believed that Colorado's law-enforcement agencies would implement the law in the spirit in which lawmakers intended. "I feel conflicted about that," she replied. She noted that one small town had already passed a resolution aimed at shielding their officers from ever being personally liable for their actions on the job. "Resistance to the bill does not make it not the law, and people will be held accountable to the standards in 217," Herod said. "I know that there are bad actors and I know that there are departments that want to shield their officers or continue with practices that are not in line with 217. For them I say, we will be watching."

Other states are watching, too. New York enacted police reforms following the George Floyd protests, including banning choke holds. But it has not opened rank-and-file officers to civil penalties for violence on the job. A bill advancing in Massachusetts would also ban choke holds and limit officers' legal protections. Advocates and lawmakers there and across the country will surely draw lessons from Colorado, both in the cultural shift already under way, and in the months ahead. They'll look to see how agencies and officers alike react to this new accountability, this incentive for restraint—and whether the changes written into law are carried out in practice as well.

Continue Reading

http://www.msn.com/en-us/...ocid=ientp

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER


What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your milli
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #16 posted 07/20/20 9:52am

OldFriends4Sal
e

avatar

moderator



Georgia police charge driver who allegedly struck and killed a deputy

Greg Norman 28 mins ago

A Georgia deputy was killed in the line of duty after being struck by a vehicle while working the scene of an accident along Interstate-85, police say.

The Franklin County Sheriff's Office, according to Fox Carolina, said William Garner had just joined the department around a year ago and now leaves behind his wife, parents and brother.

"Our thoughts and prayers are with Bill's family," the sheriff's office added in a statement.

Georgia State Police tell Fox Carolina that numerous vehicles had hydroplaned along both sides of Interstate-85 on Sunday night.

Garner was helping a group of people whose car crashed into the median when another driver traveling southbound lost control of his vehicle and exited the roadway, striking the 53-year-old deputy, they added.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/...ocid=ientp

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER


What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your milli
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #17 posted 07/23/20 11:14am

OldFriends4Sal
e

avatar

moderator

#ILoveNewYork

https://www.facebook.com/...232524833/

We Are All New York
by We Are All New York ·

Day after day, New York City Police Officers face unimaginable dangers. Recently, they've had to do their jobs while facing unprecedented criticism and oppositi...on. Listen to their stories, and remember that these men and women put their lives on the line every day to protect us #weareallnewyork

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER


What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your milli
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #18 posted 07/23/20 11:35am

jjhunsecker

avatar

I respect and appreciate every police officer who does their job correctly.
And I wish that all of them respected and appreciated people like me, law abiding citizens who just want to go about their business in peace
It’s a two way street....
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #19 posted 07/25/20 8:14pm

uPtoWnNY

OldFriends4Sale said:

NYC Guardian Angels founder says police have been 'neutered,’ and inner cities have become ‘war zones’

More than 44 people were shot in NYC over the Fourth of July weekend

Over the month of June, New York City saw a 130 percent increase in shooting incidents compared to the same time last year. Despite the increase in violent crime, New York Mayor Bill de Blasio has passed a budget slashing over $1 billion in funding from the New York Police Department and canceling the July recruit class, which includes almost 1,200 new officers.

Curtis Sliwa, founder of the New York City Guardian Angels, an unarmed civilian patrol group that was created to help combat widespread violence in NYC in the late '70s, is appalled over the direction his beloved city is headed.

“This reminds me of what it was like when I first started the Guardian Angels in 1979. Between 1979 and 1993, when thank God Rudy Giuliani was elected mayor on a law and order platform and returned stability and a quality of life to the city of New York, we had six Guardian Angels shot and killed in the line of duty. And we're starting to move back in that direction,” Sliwa told Fox News.

While some may be looking to the police to curb the rise in crime in New York City, factors like bail reform and a judicial system frozen by the coronavirus pandemic, allow suspects to be released after being arrested, often leaving the police with their hands tied.

“Imagine you're a police officer you're risking your life each and every day, you see an Uzi-toting, dope-sucking, psychopathic killing machine who's back out on the street. And you look at your partner and you say, 'What's the point of arresting them?'" Sliwa said. "The court system cut him loose and the governors are all proud of their no bail laws--and yet none of them have to deal in the streets. None of them ever have conversations with the cops.”

https://www.foxnews.com/media/nyc-guardian-angels-founder-police-neutered-inner-cities-war-zones?fbclid=IwAR1Yt3XTq6cZv34SYcrrVtZbDiaqjiT1FNE7UHe_8pF-AhaNQyopgLWlZLo

My brother (recently retired from the NYPD), knows some cops who were injured during the recent protests in NYC. They told him their hands were tied - he was furious about that and so am I. I'm for justice and fairness, but I also believe in law and order. Can't have police officers being attacked by these punks and not able to fight back. We had a long conversation about this, and my brother said they're the same types he's saw during his 20 years on the job....mfers who weren't raised right, have no values, no discipline, who are fucking up inner city neighborhoods and making it hard for decent, hard-working people to live their lives. He's right.

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #20 posted 07/28/20 5:13am

OldFriends4Sal
e

avatar

moderator

END OF WATCH: This is Detective Tanisha Pughsley. The Montgomery (Ala.) detective was shot and killed at her home earlier this week. Please take a second to thank Detective Pughsley for her service to her community: https://bit.ly/2W9B64K

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER


What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your milli
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #21 posted 07/28/20 5:41am

OldFriends4Sal
e

avatar

moderator

uPtoWnNY said:

OldFriends4Sale said:

NYC Guardian Angels founder says police have been 'neutered,’ and inner cities have become ‘war zones’

More than 44 people were shot in NYC over the Fourth of July weekend

Over the month of June, New York City saw a 130 percent increase in shooting incidents compared to the same time last year. Despite the increase in violent crime, New York Mayor Bill de Blasio has passed a budget slashing over $1 billion in funding from the New York Police Department and canceling the July recruit class, which includes almost 1,200 new officers.

Curtis Sliwa, founder of the New York City Guardian Angels, an unarmed civilian patrol group that was created to help combat widespread violence in NYC in the late '70s, is appalled over the direction his beloved city is headed.

“This reminds me of what it was like when I first started the Guardian Angels in 1979. Between 1979 and 1993, when thank God Rudy Giuliani was elected mayor on a law and order platform and returned stability and a quality of life to the city of New York, we had six Guardian Angels shot and killed in the line of duty. And we're starting to move back in that direction,” Sliwa told Fox News.

While some may be looking to the police to curb the rise in crime in New York City, factors like bail reform and a judicial system frozen by the coronavirus pandemic, allow suspects to be released after being arrested, often leaving the police with their hands tied.

“Imagine you're a police officer you're risking your life each and every day, you see an Uzi-toting, dope-sucking, psychopathic killing machine who's back out on the street. And you look at your partner and you say, 'What's the point of arresting them?'" Sliwa said. "The court system cut him loose and the governors are all proud of their no bail laws--and yet none of them have to deal in the streets. None of them ever have conversations with the cops.”

https://www.foxnews.com/media/nyc-guardian-angels-founder-police-neutered-inner-cities-war-zones?fbclid=IwAR1Yt3XTq6cZv34SYcrrVtZbDiaqjiT1FNE7UHe_8pF-AhaNQyopgLWlZLo

My brother (recently retired from the NYPD), knows some cops who were injured during the recent protests in NYC. They told him their hands were tied - he was furious about that and so am I. I'm for justice and fairness, but I also believe in law and order. Can't have police officers being attacked by these punks and not able to fight back. We had a long conversation about this, and my brother said they're the same types he's saw during his 20 years on the job....mfers who weren't raised right, have no values, no discipline, who are fucking up inner city neighborhoods and making it hard for decent, hard-working people to live their lives. He's right.

Yeah, it's a bit scary, like when you see parents get pushed around by their children.
When you get people who have no respect for law and order, I expect them to be doing some criminal things in their life. If they can do this, they can easily rape a woman.

Gangs are just waiting to take gain more leverage in the cities where Mayors are allowing this

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER


What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your milli
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply   New topic   Printable     (Log in to 'subscribe' to this topic)
« Previous topic  Next topic »
Forums > Politics & Religion > Good Cop Stories