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Thread started 07/01/20 8:03am

OldFriends4Sal
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Fact check: Ghana is not offering money, land to lure Black Americans

I first heard of this in connection to Ghana's Year of Return 'celebration'.
Ghana and the Ivory Coast is an area with a cool mix of Modern and Traditional culture.

It's a beautiful place, black sands and blue water

http://www.msn.com/en-us/...ocid=ientp

BB160peY.img?h=746&w=1119&m=6&q=60&o=f&l=f

This file photo from 2008 shows the insides of Elmina castle near Cape Coast from which African slaves were held and them transported to America. Ghana in 2020 has appealed to African Americans to immigrate to Ghana or invest in the country to "escape racism" and to get deeply immersed in African culture.

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Ghana, in a pitch to Black Americans, offers money, land to Americans to escape 'deadly' racismAn article appearing in the online publication PopularSuperstars says Ghana is offering Black Americans land and money to Americans to avoid "deadly racism."

Ghana, located in an area once known as the Gold Coast of Africa, was the hub of the trans-Atlantic slave trade and the departure point for slaves bound for America.

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Last year, Ghana declared the "Year of Return" to appeal to Black Americans to visit Ghana and become acquainted with the continent of their forefathers. Barbara Oteng-Gyasi, the minister of Tourism, Arts and Culture, said the program was a boon to the economy and to the effort to boost Ghana's tourism industry.

The BBC reported Ghana attracted a number of celebrities in 2019, including model Naomi Campbell, actor Idris Elba, comedian Steve Harvey and American rapper Cardi B.

To double down on its pitch to Black Americans, Ghana unveiled for this year a program called "Beyond the Return." According to the cited online article: "Ghana Tells Black Americans: 'We Will Pay You To Live In Ghana.'"

It said Oteng-Gyasi "offered unhappy African Americans to come to Ghana."

Related: 'I'm leaving and I'm just not coming back': Fed up with racism, Black Americans head overseas

An appeal to Black Americans

Oteng-Gyasi's overture to Black Americans has been pointed, as noted by her comments in Accra in June at a ceremony honoring George Floyd, whose death at the hands of a Minneapolis police officer touched off weeks of protests in the U.S.

"Racism in America continues to be a deadly pandemic, for which for more than 400 years now, our brothers and sisters in the United States of America have yearned for a cure," she said.

"We continue to open our arms and invite all our brothers and sisters home. Ghana is your home. Africa is your home." Oteng-Gyasi said, according to Newsweek. We have our arms wide open ready to welcome you home. ... Please take advantage, come home, build a life in Ghana. You do not have to stay where you are not wanted forever, you have a choice and Africa is waiting for you."

More: In Ghana's Year of Return, NAACP goes home on behalf of the ancestors

What is 'Beyond the Return'?

According to the tourism authority's "VisitGhana" website, "Beyond the Return" is not only aimed at promoting tourism but also fostering economic relations, trade and investments from the diaspora in Africa and the world at large.

It lists seven "pillars" of the program, including "progressive government transparent regulations" to encourage investment; developing pilgrimage infrastructure around "sites of memory," promoting tourism; and creating a sense of national consciousness anchored on key cultural festivals...

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER


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Reply #1 posted 07/01/20 8:40am

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What is 'Beyond the Return'?

According to the tourism authority's "VisitGhana" website, "Beyond the Return" is not only aimed at promoting tourism but also fostering economic relations, trade and investments from the diaspora in Africa and the world at large.

It lists seven "pillars" of the program, including
"progressive government transparent regulations" to encourage investment; developing pilgrimage infrastructure around "sites of memory," promoting tourism; and creating a sense of national consciousness anchored on key cultural festivals.

The second pillar, aimed squarely at potential emigres, "will see to the adoption of legal and policy frameworks on visa acquisition (e-visa) and the institution of a diaspora visa. It will facilitate key diaspora pathway programs such as Citizenship programs, Educational and work exchanges, Residence and work permits."

None of the pillars in this framework for "Beyond the Return" includes any reference to giving land or money for potential immigrants.

More: Fact check: Yes, Kente cloths were historically worn by empire involved in West African slave trade

Comments by Ghanaian officials indicate that the Beyond the Return program is aimed at attracting wealthier African Americans to encourage their investment in Ghana, rather than those who might need financial assistance.

"We feel that given the wealth that African Americans and Black Americans have, given that spending power, travel budgets of Blacks in America," Akwasi Agyeman, CEO of Ghana Tourism Authority tells Black Enterprise. "We felt that it's about time that we start that conversation that, instead of moving to any other destination, come back to where you came from."

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER


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Reply #2 posted 07/14/20 5:30pm

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How Africans forgot — and remembered — their role in the slave trade

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/how-africans-forgot-—-and-remembered-—-their-role-in-the-slave-trade/ar-AAG4HKw?ocid=spartanntp

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Ghana has declared a “Year of Return” for African descendants around the world to mark 400 years since the first Africans were enslaved in what would become the US. In a huge tourism push, the country has brought in celebrities from Idris Elba and Naomi Campbell to US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and 12 members of the Congressional Black Caucus.

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“I just couldn't believe [Nancy Pelosi] was coming because I think it's important,” said Mona Boyd, one of the event organizers in Ghana. “It's sort of like — I wouldn't call it mitigation, but it's just an acknowledgment: ‘Yes, this did happen, and you're not crazy for thinking that this awful thing happened. It did happen.’”

.

The slave trade changed the lives of millions of Africans and their descendants. But Boyd’s whole life, she felt like people had denied that it took place because they never talked about it. The focus had always been on moving on.

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Maybe because it had to be. Boyd grew up in segregated Arkansas under Jim Crow laws. She remembers her parents whispering about lynchings in the kitchen early in the mornings, thinking she couldn’t hear.

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In sixth grade, though, she learned that there was another place where people who looked like her lived in pride, not fear. Some visitors from Tanzania came to her nearly all-black school.

“This was like, wow,” Boyd said. “For us, it was like meeting the queen.”

.

Boyd has been drawn to Africa ever since that day.

“Most African Americans know something is missing, and you want to be reunited with it,” she said. “If you have any level of awareness about your own identity, where you came from, you would have to start asking those questions.”

Boyd, who lives in Accra, Ghana's capital, is something of an expert on this. She used to be president of the African American Association of Ghana, and she owns a tourism business for African Americans traveling to Ghana.

“Some African Americans, they have a different mindset about, you know, Africans. They think there is a much deeper brotherhood than what I think,” she said. “That’s just my opinion right now. I don’t really see the deep brotherhood that some of them think. But we all have a right to handle this in our own way.”

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And she’s seen many times how powerful the experience can be for people — standing in the same place as their last ancestor to leave this continent.

“You just don't know what's going to happen once they get that emotional,” she said. “We've had people have mental breaks.”

.

It’s a tough history to confront.

“There is a willful amnesia about the roles that we played in the slave trade,” said Nat Amarteifio, a local historian who’s also a former mayor of Accra, Ghana's capital.

He explained that when the trans-Atlantic slave trade began, leaders in this region had a lot of gold, and word got back to the Europeans. In the 1400s, the Portuguese showed up here with guns.

“Primitive guns, but guns,” Amarteifio said. “With guns, you had a vastly superior form of intimidation. It made a hell of a difference.”

.

AAG4WAx.img?h=416&w=624&m=6&q=60&u=t&o=f&l=f&x=1000&y=436

Mona Boyd, one of the organizers of the “Year of Return” in Ghana. Selase Kove-Seyram/The World

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Reply #3 posted 07/14/20 10:50pm

IanRG

OldFriends4Sale said:



How Africans forgot — and remembered — their role in the slave trade

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/how-africans-forgot-—-and-remembered-—-their-role-in-the-slave-trade/ar-AAG4HKw?ocid=spartanntp

.

.

Ghana has declared a “Year of Return” for African descendants around the world to mark 400 years since the first Africans were enslaved in what would become the US. In a huge tourism push, the country has brought in celebrities from Idris Elba and Naomi Campbell to US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and 12 members of the Congressional Black Caucus.

.

“I just couldn't believe [Nancy Pelosi] was coming because I think it's important,” said Mona Boyd, one of the event organizers in Ghana. “It's sort of like — I wouldn't call it mitigation, but it's just an acknowledgment: ‘Yes, this did happen, and you're not crazy for thinking that this awful thing happened. It did happen.’”

.

The slave trade changed the lives of millions of Africans and their descendants. But Boyd’s whole life, she felt like people had denied that it took place because they never talked about it. The focus had always been on moving on.

.

Maybe because it had to be. Boyd grew up in segregated Arkansas under Jim Crow laws. She remembers her parents whispering about lynchings in the kitchen early in the mornings, thinking she couldn’t hear.

.

In sixth grade, though, she learned that there was another place where people who looked like her lived in pride, not fear. Some visitors from Tanzania came to her nearly all-black school.

“This was like, wow,” Boyd said. “For us, it was like meeting the queen.”

.

Boyd has been drawn to Africa ever since that day.

“Most African Americans know something is missing, and you want to be reunited with it,” she said. “If you have any level of awareness about your own identity, where you came from, you would have to start asking those questions.”

Boyd, who lives in Accra, Ghana's capital, is something of an expert on this. She used to be president of the African American Association of Ghana, and she owns a tourism business for African Americans traveling to Ghana.

“Some African Americans, they have a different mindset about, you know, Africans. They think there is a much deeper brotherhood than what I think,” she said. “That’s just my opinion right now. I don’t really see the deep brotherhood that some of them think. But we all have a right to handle this in our own way.”

.

And she’s seen many times how powerful the experience can be for people — standing in the same place as their last ancestor to leave this continent.

“You just don't know what's going to happen once they get that emotional,” she said. “We've had people have mental breaks.”

.

It’s a tough history to confront.

“There is a willful amnesia about the roles that we played in the slave trade,” said Nat Amarteifio, a local historian who’s also a former mayor of Accra, Ghana's capital.

He explained that when the trans-Atlantic slave trade began, leaders in this region had a lot of gold, and word got back to the Europeans. In the 1400s, the Portuguese showed up here with guns.

“Primitive guns, but guns,” Amarteifio said. “With guns, you had a vastly superior form of intimidation. It made a hell of a difference.”

.

AAG4WAx.img?h=416&w=624&m=6&q=60&u=t&o=f&l=f&x=1000&y=436

Mona Boyd, one of the organizers of the “Year of Return” in Ghana. Selase Kove-Seyram/The World

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There is plenty of blame to share but the sharing does not reduce the evil done by any individual, business or State involved.

[Edited 7/14/20 22:50pm]

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Reply #4 posted 07/15/20 6:51am

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They named the area the Gold Coast. There was already a domestic slave trade when they arrived, Amarteifio said, although slavery didn't mean what it came to mean in America. Enslaved people had some rights and opportunities.

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Still, "The system already existed," Amarteifio said. "The Europeans saw it. And thought: 'Ah, we can try these people in our lands in the New World.'"

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But Amarteifio says the Europeans weren't going out and capturing Africans. They couldn't — they got sick and died from illnesses like malaria. Some African ethnic groups went into business, warring with other groups so they could capture prisoners they sold as slaves to the Europeans. Amarteifio says they were organized and intentional about it.

.

"To pursue slavery successfully, you need a highly organized group because somebody has to go out there — somebody has to locate the victims; somebody has to lead an army there; somebody has to capture them, transport them to the selling centers; all the time, keeping an eye on them to make sure they don't revolt," he said. "And then sell them, and move on."

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Anyone could be captured and taken. Eventually, the Portuguese were replaced by the Dutch, then the British in Ghana. Then, around the world came the abolitionist movement, the French Revolution, and increasing slave revolts, all spreading ideas about equality and humanity.

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"When slavery was abolished, it was a result of long negotiations with slave owners in Europe as well as slave owners here," Amarteifio said. "The big slave-holding nations also demanded repayment."

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The British went from being at the center of the slave trade in Ghana to — after abolition — patrolling the coast to make sure no illegal slave ships got by. They made treaties with African chiefs to protect them from other ethnic groups in a series of wars. Amarteifio says the British used those agreements to eventually declare themselves the colonial rulers.

Nat Amarteifio, a former mayor of Accra, Ghana, and local historian. Selase Kove-Seyram/The World

"They hoisted the flag and declared they were now sovereign," he said.

It was 1874. During British rule, Amarteifio says the African role in the slave trade was deliberately forgotten.

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"The chiefs and peoples decided, 'All right, we will not talk about it,'" he said. "They created a mythology that we were innocent bystanders whose land was raped by Europeans."

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The British ruled for 80 years. In 1957, Ghana became the first African country to break away from colonial ...dependence. It was the height of the US civil rights movement. Martin Luther King Jr. spoke at Ghana's first independence day.

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"In the US, we must solve this problem of racial injustice if we expect to maintain our leadership in the world, if we expect to serve as a moral voice in a world that is two-thirds colored," King said after he returned.

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African Americans started to travel to Ghana. Amarteifio was in his first year in college. He and some friends were asked to serve as guides.

.

"Naturally, we were recruited to take them around to tourist sites. So, I remember when they asked us, 'So, who was sold?' We said, "Only the bad people — thieves and drunkards,"" Amarteifio said. "I mean, we're 19, 20 years old."

.

They were just making it up because they didn't actually know what had happened.

"Especially since the history had never really been taught. And what history was taught was very sanitized. It was a disaster," Amarteifio said. "A lot of African Americans were very disappointed to find this kind of blasé attitude."

.

This is about the time Boyd first came to Africa. She had just graduated as part of one of the first classes of African Americans at Boston College after the US civil rights movement.

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"Most Africans, when I came to this country, would not admit that [the slave trade] even happened," Boyd said.

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But that was overshadowed by the personal experience she had visiting slave castles.

"We were constantly — my generation — trying to prove to white people that we were good and we were smart enough that we deserved to be there," she said. "But after I had gone through those castles, I didn't care what you thought. You just couldn't define me anymore ... after I saw what had happened, I just felt like I am from an incredible group of people. We not only survived, we fought and we thrived. You know, and it made me feel so proud. A kind of proudness I'd never felt before."

.

Boyd went back to Boston and met her Ghanaian husband, Eric Kuma Kumahia, at one of her professor's parties. She went into real estate. He was in information technology. Soon, they were both making six-figure salaries, living in a brownstone in Boston's historic South End where they could walk to the symphony.

"We were trying to get pregnant when the Rodney King thing happened," Boyd said.

It was 1991. She remembers watching that video of Los Angeles police beating Rodney King after a traffic stop. The police officers were acquitted, spurring race riots and civil unrest in LA.

"And I remember I was weeping, weeping, weeping, and I said to my husband, 'I'm not going to get pregnant if you don't agree to move back to Africa to raise our son. Why should we raise our son here when our son can go to your country where he will not be marginalized in any way?'" Boyd said.

"It was a gift to him because we gave up a lot," Boyd said. "I do think if I had a girl, I wouldn't be here [in Ghana] today."

They didn't really know what they were going to do in Ghana. They ended up in the independent car rental business. Boyd found working in Ghana liberating.

"I was able to let go of that conscious thought about race," Boyd said. "It was like having a psychic burden taken off of your shoulders, and you could just move."

She didn't realize she had more of that psychic burden to shed until a few years later. In 1994, then-Ghanaian President Jerry Rawlings apologized for the African role in slavery. Other leaders and chiefs slowly followed Rawlings and gave their own apologies.

"And it just made me feel so much better," Boyd said. "I stopped feeling resentful, you know, towards Africans about slavery."

Now, contemplating retirement, Boyd has decided she wants to make a lasting change in Ghana by adding to the small number of Ghanaian business owners. She's going to pass on her business to a colleague she trained, Mawuli Dzebu.

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER


What's the matter with your life
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Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your milli
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Reply #5 posted 07/28/20 10:31am

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https://www.nytimes.com/2...spora.html

Ghana's Uneasy Embrace of Slavery's Diaspora

By Lydia Polgreen

Dec. 27, 2005

CAPE COAST, Ghana - For centuries, Africans walked through the infamous "door of no return" at Cape Coast castle directly into slave ships, never to set foot in their homelands again. These days, the portal of this massive fort so central to one of history's greatest crimes has a new name, hung on a sign leading back in from the roaring Atlantic Ocean: "The door of return."

Ghana, through whose ports millions of Africans passed on their way to plantations in the United States, Latin America and the Caribbean, wants its descendants to come back.

Taking Israel as its model, Ghana hopes to persuade the descendants of enslaved Africans to think of Africa as their homeland -- to visit, invest, send their children to be educated and even retire here.

"We want Africans everywhere, no matter where they live or how they got there, to see Ghana as their gateway home," J. Otanka Obetsebi-Lamptey, the tourism minister, said on a recent day. "We hope we can help bring the African family back together again."

In many ways it is a quixotic goal. Ghana is doing well by West African standards -- with steady economic growth, a stable, democratic government and broad support from the West, making it a favored place for wealthy countries to give aid.

But it remains a very poor, struggling country where a third of the population lives on less than a dollar a day, life expectancy tops out at 59 and basic services like electricity and water are sometimes scarce.

Nevertheless, thousands of African-Americans already live here at least part of the year, said Valerie Papaya Mann, president of the African American Association of Ghana.


To encourage still more to come, or at least visit, Ghana plans to offer a special lifetime visa for members of the diaspora and will relax citizenship requirements so that descendants of slaves can receive Ghanaian passports. The government is also starting an advertising campaign to persuade Ghanaians to treat African-Americans more like long-lost relatives than as rich tourists. That is harder than it sounds.

Many African-Americans who visit Africa are unsettled to find that Africans treat them -- even refer to them -- the same way as white tourists. The term "obruni," or "white foreigner," is applied regardless of skin color.

To African-Americans who come here seeking their roots, the term is a sign of the chasm between Africans and African-Americans. Though they share a legacy, they experience it entirely differently.

"It is a shock for any black person to be called white," said Ms. Mann, who moved here two years ago. "But it is really tough to hear it when you come with your heart to seek your roots in Africa."


The advertising campaign urges Ghanaians to drop "obruni" in favor of "akwaaba anyemi," a slightly awkward phrase fashioned from two tribal languages meaning "welcome, sister or brother." As part of the effort to reconnect with the diaspora, Ghana plans to honor the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., W. E. B. DuBois and others it calls modern-day Josephs, after the biblical figure who rose from slavery to save his people.

The government plans to hold a huge event in 2007 to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the end of the trans-Atlantic trade by Britain and the 50th anniversary of Ghana's independence. The ceremonies will include traditional African burial rituals for the millions who died as a result of slavery.

Estimates of the trade vary widely. The most reliable suggest that between 12 million and 25 million people living in the vast lands between present-day Senegal and Angola were caught up, and as many as half died en route to the Americas.

Some perished on the long march from the inland villages where they were captured to seaports. Others died in the dungeons of slave castles and forts, where they were sometimes kept for months, until enough were gathered to pack the hold of a ship. Still others died in the middle passage, the longest leg of the triangular journey between Europe, Africa and the Americas. Of the estimated 11 million who crossed the sea, most went to South America and the Caribbean. About 500,000 are believed to have ended up in the United States.

The mass deportations and the divisions the slave trade wrought are wounds from which Africa still struggles to recover.

Ghana was the first sub-Saharan African nation to shake off its colonial rulers, winning its independence from Britain in 1957. Its founding father, Kwame Nkrumah, attended Lincoln University, a historically black college in Pennsylvania, and saw in African-Americans a key to developing the new nation.

"Nkrumah saw the American Negro as the vanguard of the African people," said Henry Louis Gates Jr., chairman of the African and African-American studies department at Harvard, who first traveled to Ghana when he was 20 and fresh out of Harvard, afire with Nkrumah's spirit. "He wanted to be able to utilize the services and skills of African-Americans as Ghana made the transition from colonialism to independence."

Many African-Americans, from Maya Angelou to Malcolm X, visited Ghana in the 1950's and 60's, and a handful stayed. To Nkrumah, the struggle for civil rights in the diaspora and the struggles for independence from colonial rule in Africa were inextricably linked, both being expressions of the desire of black people everywhere to regain their freedom.

But Nkrumah was ousted in a coup in 1966, and by then Pan-Africanism had already given way to nationalism and cold war politics, sending much of the continent down a trail of autocracy, civil war and heartbreak.

Still, African-Americans are drawn to Ghana's rich culture, and the history of slavery.

Ghana still has dozens of slave forts, each a chilling reminder of the brutality of the trade. At Elmina Castle, built by the Portuguese in 1482 and taken over by the Dutch 150 years later, visitors are guided through a Christian chapel built adjacent to the hall where slaves were auctioned, and the balcony over the women's dungeons from which the fort's governor would choose a concubine from the chattel below.

The room through which slaves passed into waiting ships is the emotional climax of the tour, a suffocating dungeon dimly lit by sunlight pouring through a narrow portal leading to the churning sea.

"You feel our history here," said Dianne Mark, an administrator at Central Michigan University who visited Elmina Castle, six miles from Cape Coast castle, in early December, tears welling in her eyes as she gazed across the massive, buttressed walls to the ocean. "This is where our people are from. That is a deep, deep experience. I look at everyone and wonder, 'Could he have been my cousin? Could she have been my aunt?' "

Like any family reunion, this one is layered with joy and tears. For African-Americans and others in the African diaspora, there is lingering hostility and confusion about the role Africans played in the slave trade.

"The myth was our African ancestors were out on a walk one day and some bad white dude threw a net over them," Mr. Gates said. "But that wasn't the way it happened. It wouldn't have been possible without the help of Africans."

Many Africans, meanwhile, often fail to see any connection at all between them and African-Americans, or feel African-Americans are better off for having been taken to the United States. Many Africans strive to emigrate; for the past 15 years, the number of Africans moving to the United States has surpassed estimates of the number forced there during any of the peak years of the slave trade. The number of immigrants from Ghana in the United States is larger than that of any other African country except Nigeria, according to the 2000 census.

"So many Africans want to go to America, so they can't understand why Americans would want to come here," said Philip Amoa-Mensah, a guide at Elmina Castle. "Maybe Ghanaians think they are lucky to be from America, even though their ancestors went through so much pain."

The relationship is clearly a work in progress. Ghanaians are still learning of their ancestors' pivotal roles in the slave trade, and slave forts on the coast, long used to thousands of foreign visitors, have in recent years become sites for school field trips.

When the United States and the United Nations gave Ghana money to rehabilitate and restore Cape Coast castle, the government agency responsible for the castle repainted it white. Residents of Cape Coast were thrilled to see the moisture-blackened castle spruced up, but African-Americans living in Ghana were horrified, feeling that the history of their ancestors was being, quite literally, whitewashed.

"It didn't go over too well," said Kohain Nathanyah Halevi, an African-American who lives near Cape Coast.

A recent African-American visitor to Cape Coast castle took the emotionally charged step through the door of no return, only to be greeted by a pair of toddlers playing in a fishing boat on the other side, pointing and shouting, "obruni, obruni!"

William Kwaku Moses, 71, a retired security guard who sells shells to tourists on the other side of the door of no return, shushed the children.

"We are trying," he said, with a shrug.

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER


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Reply #6 posted 07/28/20 1:59pm

onlyforaminute

I can't wait to visit there. Zero plans on moving there. It's not cheap there. Would love to go to Nigeria too.
If you carry the egg basket do not dance.

Do good, then throw it into the sea.

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Reply #7 posted 07/28/20 4:12pm

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onlyforaminute said:

I can't wait to visit there. Zero plans on moving there. It's not cheap there. Would love to go to Nigeria too.

I've been to Ghana and the Ivory Coast, yes it's a must.

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER


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Reply #8 posted 07/28/20 5:07pm

onlyforaminute

OldFriends4Sale said:



onlyforaminute said:


I can't wait to visit there. Zero plans on moving there. It's not cheap there. Would love to go to Nigeria too.



I've been to Ghana and the Ivory Coast, yes it's a must.




Interesting. I've heard positives and negatives. Hopefully the ivory coast cruise line is coming soon.
If you carry the egg basket do not dance.

Do good, then throw it into the sea.

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Reply #9 posted 08/03/20 7:55am

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So tell me are you free?
while we campaign for every
dead ni--a blvd
so young motherfuckers can
drive down it in your fancy cars
free
you try to hold on to some africa of the past
one must remember
it's other africans
that helped enslave your ass

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KLNSBgvWBGs

Meshell Ndegeocello - «Dead Ni&&a Blvd.» https://prince.org/msg/8/463899?pg=1

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER


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Reply #10 posted 08/03/20 11:55am

onlyforaminute

onlyforaminute said:

OldFriends4Sale said:



onlyforaminute said:


I can't wait to visit there. Zero plans on moving there. It's not cheap there. Would love to go to Nigeria too.



I've been to Ghana and the Ivory Coast, yes it's a must.




Interesting. I've heard positives and negatives. Hopefully the ivory coast cruise line is coming soon.

Let me see what dumb questions I can come up with about stuff I really wanna know. There's stuff on hotels, renting cars, and activities but theres question nobody ask. Now I know the desire is to draw the people with money, but some of us broke folks wanna taste too. So what's the travelers guide for the broke, broke?
So how many days would you recommend someone stay to get a nice feel for the culture? 3days? The beaches, how are they? Is there a beach culure? Or would one be looked at weirdly? Can one survive avoiding all spicy food? How much of the language should one know? I realize they speak English but would knowing 2 good sentences be appreciated? How is it just wandering around as a free spirit?
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onlyforaminute said:

onlyforaminute said:
Interesting. I've heard positives and negatives. Hopefully the ivory coast cruise line is coming soon.
Let me see what dumb questions I can come up with about stuff I really wanna know. There's stuff on hotels, renting cars, and activities but theres question nobody ask. Now I know the desire is to draw the people with money, but some of us broke folks wanna taste too. So what's the travelers guide for the broke, broke? So how many days would you recommend someone stay to get a nice feel for the culture? 3days? The beaches, how are they? Is there a beach culure? Or would one be looked at weirdly? Can one survive avoiding all spicy food? How much of the language should one know? I realize they speak English but would knowing 2 good sentences be appreciated? How is it just wandering around as a free spirit?

The world is a different place since I've been there. I also went with an American Ghanaian/

Many people do speak English though and there are native American-Africans living there

Beach culture is really cool.

I stayed about 4 days and onto Egypt.

IBB and post some more concrete answers for you

Top 5 beaches in Ghana | TravelLocal

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Is poverty bringing U down?
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