independent and unofficial
Prince fan community
Forum jump
Forums > Politics & Religion > Outstanding political video - March by the Chicks
« Previous topic  Next topic »
Page 1 of 2 12>
Reply   New topic   Printable     (Log in to 'subscribe' to this topic)
Author

Tweet     Share

Message
Thread started 07/04/20 9:30am

gandorb

Outstanding political video - March by the Chicks

Here is a wonderful video by The Chicks released right after they dropped the Dixie part of their name.

God bless them!

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/w...wBjF_VVFvE[/youtube]

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #1 posted 07/04/20 9:39am

CherryMoon57

avatar

Nice tune. Shame they felt they had to change their name, I liked it better before. It evoked the Dixieland jazz, Southern folk culture, New Orleans, etc.

Life Matters
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #2 posted 07/04/20 9:59am

CherryMoon57

avatar

I also wonder how African-Americans feel about the continual association with the queer culture, especially those who don't necessarily identify with (or by) it.

Life Matters
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #3 posted 07/04/20 10:53am

gandorb

The term Dixie was originated to distinguish the slave owning states vs. "the free states". Although often used to talk about the Southern states, it is still associated in may ways with the whole issue of slavery. I went to Robert E. Lee High school not far from where the Dixieland Jazz was being played. Our team were the Rebels, and the school song was Dixie. When the band played Dixie, people throughout the stands would wave their confederate flags. While I didn't wave a flag myself, I didn't really think about how offensive that must have been to our black students. I have never heard a black Southerner refer anything about themselves as being from Dixie. I am sure there was a differnt consciousness in the beginning of the 20th Century when Dixieland Jazz started.

You ask an intersting questions about how Blacks feel about the mixing of black ciivil right marches with gay rights marches. I have heard a diverity of views, but as a White guy I certainly can't speak from that perspective. The video using the Black Trans Live Matter definitely seems to value an aspect of the Black Lives Matter movement: A culture is not measured by how the most privileged people are treated but how the most stigmitized groups are treated. Some may disagree with this general view in terms of Black Lives Matter, but it is certainly copnsistent with the video. Of note, there was recently a march in Brooklyn for Black Trans Lives Matter that reportedly drew 10,000, may who were Black.

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #4 posted 07/04/20 1:51pm

CherryMoon57

avatar

gandorb said:

The term Dixie was originated to distinguish the slave owning states vs. "the free states". Although often used to talk about the Southern states, it is still associated in may ways with the whole issue of slavery. I went to Robert E. Lee High school not far from where the Dixieland Jazz was being played. Our team were the Rebels, and the school song was Dixie. When the band played Dixie, people throughout the stands would wave their confederate flags. While I didn't wave a flag myself, I didn't really think about how offensive that must have been to our black students. I have never heard a black Southerner refer anything about themselves as being from Dixie. I am sure there was a differnt consciousness in the beginning of the 20th Century when Dixieland Jazz started.

You ask an intersting questions about how Blacks feel about the mixing of black ciivil right marches with gay rights marches. I have heard a diverity of views, but as a White guy I certainly can't speak from that perspective. The video using the Black Trans Live Matter definitely seems to value an aspect of the Black Lives Matter movement: A culture is not measured by how the most privileged people are treated but how the most stigmitized groups are treated. Some may disagree with this general view in terms of Black Lives Matter, but it is certainly copnsistent with the video. Of note, there was recently a march in Brooklyn for Black Trans Lives Matter that reportedly drew 10,000, may who were Black.


Thanks for your comprehensive reply. I had not realised how negative the term was until you explained it to me (I never visited that area during my stays in the States). You also made an interesting point about culture being measured by how the most stigmatised groups are treated.

But then again, it all depends on what you mean by 'priviledged' or 'stigmatised'. There are many people who are not priviledged in any walks of lives, but the current movement only seems to focus on LGBTQ and blacks.

Why not add the blind, the disabled, the ugly, the poor, the orphan, the bullied, the lonely, etc of all racial ethnicities. There are also many rich [insert any skin colour, gender or sexuality] celebrities who are way more priviledged than the average [insert any skin colour, gender or sexuality] nobody down the road.

I guesse it's all a matter of perspective.

Life Matters
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #5 posted 07/04/20 2:07pm

2elijah

avatar

Gandorb,

Thanks for posting that video. Not only was it outstanding, but excellent at its best. It sends a message that protests against oppression matters. The number of names of those murdered, at the end of the vid is heart wrenching. I applaud all those who stand up against discrimination/oppression; and those who are never afraid to stand up against those who try to silence them. The brave vs the cowards. Beautiful video. It speaks volumes.
[Edited 7/4/20 14:36pm]
Always smile in the face of adversity. smile
#NOFEAR
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #6 posted 07/04/20 2:14pm

gandorb

Yes, there is some personal perspective and relativity to what constitutes who is the most discriminated against and the history behind it. Yes, individuals with severe disability often do go through incredible adversity and discrimination. While there aren't many marches for their rights, they do have organizations that promote their civil rights through legislation of the . One of the biggest triumphs was the American Disability Act of 1990 which was meant to protect their civil rights. As far as Black Trans, they have an extremely high rate of being victims of suicide, homicide, complete family rejection, poverty, and homelessness among other issues.

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #7 posted 07/04/20 2:15pm

gandorb

2elijah said:

Gandorb, Thanks for posting that video. Not only was it outstanding, but excellent at its best. It sends a message that protests against oppression matters. The number of names of those murdered, at the end of the vid is heart wrenching. I applaud all those who stand up against discrimination/oppression, and those who try to silence them. The brave vs the cowards. Beautiful video. It speaks volumes. [Edited 7/4/20 14:14pm]

highfive

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #8 posted 07/04/20 2:39pm

2elijah

avatar

gandorb said:



2elijah said:


Gandorb, Thanks for posting that video. Not only was it outstanding, but excellent at its best. It sends a message that protests against oppression matters. The number of names of those murdered, at the end of the vid is heart wrenching. I applaud all those who stand up against discrimination/oppression; and those who are never afraid to stand up against those who try to silence them. The brave vs the cowards. Beautiful video. It speaks volumes. [Edited 7/4/20 14:14pm]


highfive


I remember how unfair they were treated, when they voiced their views against the Iraq war, when Bush was president. They definitely did a good job with that song and video. At least this time, they don’t be silenced.
[Edited 7/4/20 16:40pm]
Always smile in the face of adversity. smile
#NOFEAR
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #9 posted 07/04/20 3:53pm

jjhunsecker

avatar

CherryMoon57 said:

I also wonder how African-Americans feel about the continual association with the queer culture, especially those who don't necessarily identify with (or by) it.



Several prominent organizers and cultural figures in the Civil Rights Movement were gay or bisexual- Bayard Rustin, James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry...

And every Black person who is a regular church goer knows several gay people very well... they are running the church choir
biggrin
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #10 posted 07/04/20 4:02pm

CherryMoon57

avatar

gandorb said:

Yes, there is some personal perspective and relativity to what constitutes who is the most discriminated against and the history behind it. Yes, individuals with severe disability often do go through incredible adversity and discrimination. While there aren't many marches for their rights, they do have organizations that promote their civil rights through legislation of the . One of the biggest triumphs was the American Disability Act of 1990 which was meant to protect their civil rights. As far as Black Trans, they have an extremely high rate of being victims of suicide, homicide, complete family rejection, poverty, and homelessness among other issues.


Many milestone laws have been passed in support of the LGBTQ+ since the 1950s, more than ever so in the past decade. I would even venture to say that LGBTQ+ has almost become the 'new normal'. As for the suicide rate, family rejection, poverty and homelessness, that too is extremely high among the disabled. Still, their cause is rarely mentioned at all.

Life Matters
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #11 posted 07/04/20 4:16pm

CherryMoon57

avatar

jjhunsecker said:

CherryMoon57 said:

I also wonder how African-Americans feel about the continual association with the queer culture, especially those who don't necessarily identify with (or by) it.

Several prominent organizers and cultural figures in the Civil Rights Movement were gay or bisexual- Bayard Rustin, James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry... And every Black person who is a regular church goer knows several gay people very well... they are running the church choir biggrin


Do you think that may have influenced the direction taken by thus civil rights movements?

As for the church goers, if you're happy and you know it, you know the rest... wink

Life Matters
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #12 posted 07/04/20 4:36pm

jjhunsecker

avatar

CherryMoon57 said:



jjhunsecker said:


CherryMoon57 said:

I also wonder how African-Americans feel about the continual association with the queer culture, especially those who don't necessarily identify with (or by) it.



Several prominent organizers and cultural figures in the Civil Rights Movement were gay or bisexual- Bayard Rustin, James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry... And every Black person who is a regular church goer knows several gay people very well... they are running the church choir biggrin


Do you think that may have influenced the direction taken by thus civil rights movements?

As for the church goers, if you're happy and you know it, you know the rest... wink



Maybe their experiences as “double outsiders “ strengthened their commitment to the struggle. But that’s something that would involve a deeper insight into their personal psyche
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #13 posted 07/04/20 4:48pm

gandorb

jjhunsecker said:

CherryMoon57 said:

I also wonder how African-Americans feel about the continual association with the queer culture, especially those who don't necessarily identify with (or by) it.

Several prominent organizers and cultural figures in the Civil Rights Movement were gay or bisexual- Bayard Rustin, James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry... And every Black person who is a regular church goer knows several gay people very well... they are running the church choir biggrin

lol

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #14 posted 07/04/20 11:09pm

lazycrockett

avatar

The group has always spoken their truth, be it domestic violence, the Bush wars, Gay rights or Black Lives Matter.

They aint never gonna be ready to make nice.

The Most Important Thing In Life Is Sincerity....Once You Can Fake That, You Can Fake Anything.
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #15 posted 07/05/20 3:30am

2elijah

avatar

I love the quote in the beginning of that video. So much truth to it.
[Edited 7/6/20 9:30am]
Always smile in the face of adversity. smile
#NOFEAR
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #16 posted 07/05/20 3:34am

CherryMoon57

avatar

gandorb said:

The term Dixie was originated to distinguish the slave owning states vs. "the free states". Although often used to talk about the Southern states, it is still associated in may ways with the whole issue of slavery. I went to Robert E. Lee High school not far from where the Dixieland Jazz was being played. Our team were the Rebels, and the school song was Dixie. When the band played Dixie, people throughout the stands would wave their confederate flags. While I didn't wave a flag myself, I didn't really think about how offensive that must have been to our black students. I have never heard a black Southerner refer anything about themselves as being from Dixie. I am sure there was a differnt consciousness in the beginning of the 20th Century when Dixieland Jazz started.

You ask an intersting questions about how Blacks feel about the mixing of black ciivil right marches with gay rights marches. I have heard a diverity of views, but as a White guy I certainly can't speak from that perspective. The video using the Black Trans Live Matter definitely seems to value an aspect of the Black Lives Matter movement: A culture is not measured by how the most privileged people are treated but how the most stigmitized groups are treated. Some may disagree with this general view in terms of Black Lives Matter, but it is certainly copnsistent with the video. Of note, there was recently a march in Brooklyn for Black Trans Lives Matter that reportedly drew 10,000, may who were Black.

One question remain though: if, as you said, the term 'Dixie' has been associated with 'the whole issue of slavery' for such a long time, why did this band opted for that name to start with and why did it take them until now to change it? Sorry, that's actually two questions.

[Edited 7/5/20 3:56am]

Life Matters
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #17 posted 07/05/20 5:55am

gandorb

CherryMoon57 said:

gandorb said:

The term Dixie was originated to distinguish the slave owning states vs. "the free states". Although often used to talk about the Southern states, it is still associated in may ways with the whole issue of slavery. I went to Robert E. Lee High school not far from where the Dixieland Jazz was being played. Our team were the Rebels, and the school song was Dixie. When the band played Dixie, people throughout the stands would wave their confederate flags. While I didn't wave a flag myself, I didn't really think about how offensive that must have been to our black students. I have never heard a black Southerner refer anything about themselves as being from Dixie. I am sure there was a differnt consciousness in the beginning of the 20th Century when Dixieland Jazz started.

You ask an intersting questions about how Blacks feel about the mixing of black ciivil right marches with gay rights marches. I have heard a diverity of views, but as a White guy I certainly can't speak from that perspective. The video using the Black Trans Live Matter definitely seems to value an aspect of the Black Lives Matter movement: A culture is not measured by how the most privileged people are treated but how the most stigmitized groups are treated. Some may disagree with this general view in terms of Black Lives Matter, but it is certainly copnsistent with the video. Of note, there was recently a march in Brooklyn for Black Trans Lives Matter that reportedly drew 10,000, may who were Black.

One question remain though: if, as you said, the term 'Dixie' has been associated with 'the whole issue of slavery' for such a long time, why did this band opted for that name to start with and why did it take them until now to change it? Sorry, that's actually two questions.

[Edited 7/5/20 3:56am]

I don't know. I think that a lot of people who don't consider themselves racists still say and unknowlingly do things that might be perceived by black people as hurtful or at least as being incosiderate. The cultural diversity term for this is microaggressions. I think the term Dixie was not necessarily used by Whites as intentionally racist but conveying that they were from the South, unlike the N word and other words that were clearly racist in intent. I never really heard that the Dixie Chicks got flack for using this in the past, maybe because nothing in their music seems intentionally racist. I do think that he discussion of the Black Lives Matter movement has raised awareness of the terms and symbols with racist roots, and this is what likely prompted them to drop the Dixie. Another country group changed their name from Lady Antebellum to Lady A a few days prior to the Chicks change, as in America antebellum is assoiciated with the pre-Civil War period.

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #18 posted 07/05/20 7:33am

CherryMoon57

avatar

gandorb said:

CherryMoon57 said:

One question remain though: if, as you said, the term 'Dixie' has been associated with 'the whole issue of slavery' for such a long time, why did this band opted for that name to start with and why did it take them until now to change it? Sorry, that's actually two questions.

[Edited 7/5/20 3:56am]

I don't know. I think that a lot of people who don't consider themselves racists still say and unknowlingly do things that might be perceived by black people as hurtful or at least as being incosiderate. The cultural diversity term for this is microaggressions. I think the term Dixie was not necessarily used by Whites as intentionally racist but conveying that they were from the South, unlike the N word and other words that were clearly racist in intent. I never really heard that the Dixie Chicks got flack for using this in the past, maybe because nothing in their music seems intentionally racist. I do think that he discussion of the Black Lives Matter movement has raised awareness of the terms and symbols with racist roots, and this is what likely prompted them to drop the Dixie. Another country group changed their name from Lady Antebellum to Lady A a few days prior to the Chicks change, as in America antebellum is assoiciated with the pre-Civil War period.


This is a bit of a slippery slope though. How about creating a brand new language altogether, since the global spread of English wouldn't have happened without imperialism and colonialism. How far do you think these connected roots go and where do you actually draw the line? I don't think it is possible to erase all traces of history or not offend anyone in any way. Personally, I think the Dixie Chicks' timely change of name is more of a strategic move than a brave one. Imagine how many fans (and $$$) they would have lost if the name would have remained the same during these very political times. They had no choice.

Life Matters
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #19 posted 07/05/20 8:09am

gandorb

CherryMoon57 said:

gandorb said:

I don't know. I think that a lot of people who don't consider themselves racists still say and unknowlingly do things that might be perceived by black people as hurtful or at least as being incosiderate. The cultural diversity term for this is microaggressions. I think the term Dixie was not necessarily used by Whites as intentionally racist but conveying that they were from the South, unlike the N word and other words that were clearly racist in intent. I never really heard that the Dixie Chicks got flack for using this in the past, maybe because nothing in their music seems intentionally racist. I do think that he discussion of the Black Lives Matter movement has raised awareness of the terms and symbols with racist roots, and this is what likely prompted them to drop the Dixie. Another country group changed their name from Lady Antebellum to Lady A a few days prior to the Chicks change, as in America antebellum is assoiciated with the pre-Civil War period.


This is a bit of a slippery slope though. How about creating a brand new language altogether, since the global spread of English wouldn't have happened without imperialism and colonialism. How far do you think these connected roots go and where do you actually draw the line? I don't think it is possible to erase all traces of history or not offend anyone in any way. Personally, I think the Dixie Chicks' timely change of name is more of a strategic move than a brave one. Imagine how many fans (and $$$) they would have lost if the name would have remained the same during these very political times. They had no choice.

I get the slippery slope idea and the idea of capitalization. In the Dixie Chicks case, their origins in conservative country radio means that this stand probably cost them some of their remaining country fans that didn't stop following them when they spoke out against President Bush. They have never taken the easiest route to success, from insisting on use the banjo and fiddle in their music when no stations played that kind of music, speaking out against Bush and being totally blackballed, releasing their next album after the Bush furor with "I am Not Ready to Make Nice" rather than the expected apology. and now this. Their political moves have cost them more fans that they have gained, as they were extremely popular in the US before the Bush comments and their sales decreased after that. So, I don't think they would think that it is a shrewd commercial move, especially as you pointed out that the video includes many types of marches that may be offensive to some other groups. I really do think it represents their world view, especially of Natalie Maines. It is not like Urban or pop radio is going to play March, and there is no way country radio will play any future releases. I do think that they don't want to be perceived as part of the racism problem, and in that way they may have been image conscious to ensure that they aren't. I know this may come across as naive on my part, but I can be cynical about these things at times

as well.

By the way, a similar thing was true of Tom Petty. Being a southerner, he often had a confederate flag on tour as well as rebel references in some of his songs. Besides this, I am not aware of any racist lyrics or references. After one of then furors happened following another police killing or some other incident that promoted discussion, he apologised for using the flag and vowed never to do it again. H wasn't under any external pressure to do so as far as I know, and many of his fans completely abandoned him for it. He was called a sellout and so forth. This was late in his career so it is hard to judge the commercial impact, but his name was dragged through mud more than praised from what i heard on message boards and so forth. It is never easy to change courses when your fans expect more of the same from you. Our Prince experiences that too in a differnt way. Sorry to digress, but it is an interesting topic.

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #20 posted 07/05/20 8:39am

CherryMoon57

avatar

gandorb said:

CherryMoon57 said:


This is a bit of a slippery slope though. How about creating a brand new language altogether, since the global spread of English wouldn't have happened without imperialism and colonialism. How far do you think these connected roots go and where do you actually draw the line? I don't think it is possible to erase all traces of history or not offend anyone in any way. Personally, I think the Dixie Chicks' timely change of name is more of a strategic move than a brave one. Imagine how many fans (and $$$) they would have lost if the name would have remained the same during these very political times. They had no choice.

I get the slippery slope idea and the idea of capitalization. In the Dixie Chicks case, their origins in conservative country radio means that this stand probably cost them some of their remaining country fans that didn't stop following them when they spoke out against President Bush. They have never taken the easiest route to success, from insisting on use the banjo and fiddle in their music when no stations played that kind of music, speaking out against Bush and being totally blackballed, releasing their next album after the Bush furor with "I am Not Ready to Make Nice" rather than the expected apology. and now this. Their political moves have cost them more fans that they have gained, as they were extremely popular in the US before the Bush comments and their sales decreased after that. So, I don't think they would think that it is a shrewd commercial move, especially as you pointed out that the video includes many types of marches that may be offensive to some other groups. I really do think it represents their world view, especially of Natalie Maines. It is not like Urban or pop radio is going to play March, and there is no way country radio will play any future releases. I do think that they don't want to be perceived as part of the racism problem, and in that way they may have been image conscious to ensure that they aren't. I know this may come across as naive on my part, but I can be cynical about these things at times

as well.

By the way, a similar thing was true of Tom Petty. Being a southerner, he often had a confederate flag on tour as well as rebel references in some of his songs. Besides this, I am not aware of any racist lyrics or references. After one of then furors happened following another police killing or some other incident that promoted discussion, he apologised for using the flag and vowed never to do it again. H wasn't under any external pressure to do so as far as I know, and many of his fans completely abandoned him for it. He was called a sellout and so forth. This was late in his career so it is hard to judge the commercial impact, but his name was dragged through mud more than praised from what i heard on message boards and so forth. It is never easy to change courses when your fans expect more of the same from you. Our Prince experiences that too in a differnt way. Sorry to digress, but it is an interesting topic.

You clearly know more than I do about them and perhaps I was a little hasty in my judgement. From all that you described, it does sound like they acted with integrity in the past. That said, the popular BLM movement is currently spreading like wildfire and I am sure there would still be far many more fans to win over in the process than to lose with that move. Especially since their sales decreased following their open stance against Bush. Whatever the reasons, this will no doubt give their career a new lease of life. Not only it sounds good but I (and many) would have probably never seen that video or heard about them again if it wasn't for the political aspect of the song or their name change.

Life Matters
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #21 posted 07/06/20 1:05pm

DiminutiveRock
er

avatar

The Chicks have always marched to the beat of their own drum despite criticism.

"if your voice held no power, they wouldn't try to silence you."
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #22 posted 07/06/20 1:10pm

DiminutiveRock
er

avatar

2elijah said:

I love the quote in the beginning of that video. So much truth to it. [Edited 7/6/20 9:30am]



nod


"if your voice held no power, they wouldn't try to silence you."

"if your voice held no power, they wouldn't try to silence you."
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #23 posted 07/06/20 2:27pm

2elijah

avatar

DiminutiveRocker said:



2elijah said:


I love the quote in the beginning of that video. So much truth to it. [Edited 7/6/20 9:30am]



nod


"if your voice held no power, they wouldn't try to silence you."


I wholeheartedly agree with that quote. Many fear exposure of injustices will force change and deprive them of privileges/liberties they take advantage of but denied for others.
Always smile in the face of adversity. smile
#NOFEAR
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #24 posted 07/07/20 11:16am

noimageatall

avatar

2elijah said:

gandorb said:

highfive

I remember how unfair they were treated, when they voiced their views against the Iraq war, when Bush was president. They definitely did a good job with that song and video. At least this time, they don’t be silenced. [Edited 7/4/20 16:40pm]

I remember too. They were trashed/ripped to shreds for speaking out about Bush. I saw this video on twitter last month and by the time it ended I was bawling. bawl I shared it everywhere I could. Just powerful! I love the quote too...I use it when some folks try to tell me your vote doesn't count. Believe me, if it didn't, they wouldn't have gutted the VRA and they wouldn't close down hundreds of voting locations like they just did in GA.

"if your voice held no power, they wouldn't try to silence you."

"Let love be your perfect weapon..." ~~Andy Biersack
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #25 posted 07/07/20 11:19am

noimageatall

avatar

lazycrockett said:

The group has always spoken their truth, be it domestic violence, the Bush wars, Gay rights or Black Lives Matter.

They aint never gonna be ready to make nice.

Exactly!

thumbs up! nod headbang worship clapping

"Let love be your perfect weapon..." ~~Andy Biersack
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #26 posted 07/07/20 12:53pm

2elijah

avatar

noimageatall said:



2elijah said:


gandorb said:



highfive



I remember how unfair they were treated, when they voiced their views against the Iraq war, when Bush was president. They definitely did a good job with that song and video. At least this time, they don’t be silenced. [Edited 7/4/20 16:40pm]


I remember too. They were trashed/ripped to shreds for speaking out about Bush. I saw this video on twitter last month and by the time it ended I was bawling. bawl I shared it everywhere I could. Just powerful! I love the quote too...I use it when some folks try to tell me your vote doesn't count. Believe me, if it didn't, they wouldn't have gutted the VRA and they wouldn't close down hundreds of voting locations like they just did in GA.


"if your voice held no power, they wouldn't try to silence you."


Absolutely agree!
Always smile in the face of adversity. smile
#NOFEAR
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #27 posted 07/07/20 1:04pm

noimageatall

avatar

2elijah said:

noimageatall said:

I remember too. They were trashed/ripped to shreds for speaking out about Bush. I saw this video on twitter last month and by the time it ended I was bawling. bawl I shared it everywhere I could. Just powerful! I love the quote too...I use it when some folks try to tell me your vote doesn't count. Believe me, if it didn't, they wouldn't have gutted the VRA and they wouldn't close down hundreds of voting locations like they just did in GA.

"if your voice held no power, they wouldn't try to silence you."

Absolutely agree!

thumbs up!

"Let love be your perfect weapon..." ~~Andy Biersack
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #28 posted 07/07/20 5:56pm

gandorb

noimageatall said:

2elijah said:

gandorb said: I remember how unfair they were treated, when they voiced their views against the Iraq war, when Bush was president. They definitely did a good job with that song and video. At least this time, they don’t be silenced. [Edited 7/4/20 16:40pm]

I remember too. They were trashed/ripped to shreds for speaking out about Bush. I saw this video on twitter last month and by the time it ended I was bawling. bawl I shared it everywhere I could. Just powerful! I love the quote too...I use it when some folks try to tell me your vote doesn't count. Believe me, if it didn't, they wouldn't have gutted the VRA and they wouldn't close down hundreds of voting locations like they just did in GA.

"if your voice held no power, they wouldn't try to silence you."

Yes to all of this. Love the quote.

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #29 posted 07/08/20 10:11am

2elijah

avatar

gandorb said:[quote]



noimageatall said:




2elijah said:


gandorb said: I remember how unfair they were treated, when they voiced their views against the Iraq war, when Bush was president. They definitely did a good job with that song and video. At least this time, they don’t be silenced. [Edited 7/4/20 16:40pm]


I remember too. They were trashed/ripped to shreds for speaking out about Bush. I saw this video on twitter last month and by the time it ended I was bawling. bawl I shared it everywhere I could. Just powerful! I love the quote too...I use it when some folks try to tell me your vote doesn't count. Believe me, if it didn't, they wouldn't have gutted the VRA and they wouldn't close down hundreds of voting locations like they just did in GA.


"if your voice held no power, they wouldn't try to silence you."





The recent peaceful protests, including the current movement, that is larger than civil rights era, is forcing many to face the ugly history and truths behind America’ racism. The video itself, displays the emotions, anger and desperation of those who boldly stare the ugliness of this country’s injustices, in its face, and expose it for what it is. The protests are just the beginning leading to forced changes that has to happen, to once and for all kill the disease of racism and other injustices, that for so long has infected this country for years. Like the quote says at the beginning “If your voice held no power, they wouldn’t try to silence you.”

Well, let those voices continue to ring loud.
[Edited 7/8/20 10:27am]
Always smile in the face of adversity. smile
#NOFEAR
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Page 1 of 2 12>
Reply   New topic   Printable     (Log in to 'subscribe' to this topic)
« Previous topic  Next topic »
Forums > Politics & Religion > Outstanding political video - March by the Chicks